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January 7, 2016
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An endangered, historically significant, Middle Eastern artifact may soon be coming to a location near you — well, a plastic copy of it, anyway.

Harvard University, Oxford University, and Dubai's Museum of the Future are teaming up at the Institute for Digital Archaeology to 3D-print several replicas of the Arch of Palmyra this spring and display them in public spaces and museums in New York and London. This is just one step in the Institute's larger plan to develop a one-million-image database documenting important historical artifacts for potential 3D replication.

The project takes on a new urgency in light of ISIS terrorists' disturbing habit of blowing up historical sites like Palmyra, where the arch narrowly survived demolition this fall. Bonnie Kristian

12:31 a.m. ET

A magnitude 6.1 earthquake that rocked central Italy early Tuesday morning has killed at least two people and destroyed buildings in several towns in the province of Umbria, according to Italian officials. "Half the town no longer exists," Sergio Pirozzi, mayor of Amatrice, said on national TV. "There are people stuck in the rubble.... Houses are no longer there." Damage and power outages were also reported as far away as Italy's east coast and in coastal Lazio, south of Rome. Along with Amatrice, the towns of Accumoli and Norcia were also badly damaged.

The epicenter of the shallow quake, identified as a 6.2 magnitude temblor by the U.S. Geological Survey and 6.1 by the European Mediterranean Seismological Center, was about 100 miles northeast of Rome. Buildings shook for about 20 seconds in Italy's capital. Fabrizio Curcio, director of Italy's Civil Protection Department, said that the overnight earthquake had been "severe" and that Italy has initiated its emergency protocols. More than 300 people were killed in a magnitude 6.3 earthquake in central Italy in 2009. Peter Weber

12:03 a.m. ET
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A new Reuters/Ipsos poll released Tuesday shows Hillary Clinton leading Donald Trump by 12 percentage points among likely voters.

The poll found that 45 percent of voters are supporting Clinton, while 33 percent are behind Trump and 22 percent would not pick either. In a separate four-way poll that included Gary Johnson, the Libertarian nominee, and the Green Party's Jill Stein, 41 percent supported Clinton, 33 percent backed Trump, 7 percent were for Johnson, and 2 percent supported Stein. The polls were conducted August 18-22, with 1,115 respondents and a measure of accuracy of 3 percentage points. Catherine Garcia

August 23, 2016
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A poll conducted by the Feldman Group shows Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump in a dead heat in South Carolina.

The poll, paid for by the South Carolina Democratic Party, found the candidates tied at 39 percent. In a memo accompanying the poll results, the Feldman Group said Clinton could win South Carolina in November "if her campaign chooses to contest the state." The poll of 600 likely voters took place between August 18 and 21. On Twitter, South Carolina GOP Chairman Matt Moore called the results "bogus."

South Carolina has not voted for a Democrat for president since Jimmy Carter in 1976. Earlier this month, a Public Policy Polling survey in the state found Trump ahead of Clinton by only 2 points. Catherine Garcia

August 23, 2016
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A magnitude 6.2 earthquake rocked central Italy early Wednesday morning, south of the city of Perugia. The U.S. Geological Survey says the quake hit at a very shallow depth of six miles, and the La Repubblica newspaper says some buildings in Rome shook for 20 seconds. There are no reports of any casualties or structure damage. Catherine Garcia

August 23, 2016
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On Tuesday, The New York Times said that hackers targeted its Moscow bureau, but that it does not appear they successfully infiltrated their system.

"We are constantly monitoring our systems with the latest available intelligence and tools," Times spokeswoman Eileen Murphy said. "We have seen no evidence that any of our internal systems, including our systems in the Moscow bureau, have been breached or compromised." The Times believes the hackers were Russian. Earlier in the day, CNN reported that U.S. officials told them the FBI was investigating cyber attacks against reporters from the Times and other news organizations. The Times was attacked by two separate groups of hackers in 2013: The Syrian Electronic Army and a group from China. Catherine Garcia

August 23, 2016
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By next year, federal regulators could enact new rules preventing people from getting within 50 yards of spinner dolphins off the shores of Hawaii, putting an end to popular tourist activities like swimming with dolphins.

The National Marine Fisheries Service says that spinner dolphins, which feed at night and usually gather in the same general area every day, are not getting enough rest and are becoming stressed due to so many people taking boat tours that drop them off next to pods. The dolphins sometimes appear to be awake even when they're asleep, as half of their brain remains awake so they can surface and breathe. Dozens of companies operate dolphin tours on Maui, Kauai, Oahu, and the Big Island, and because 98 percent of spinner dolphins in Hawaii are just off the shore, it's easy for them to find the animals. The ban would cover waters out to 2 nautical miles, The Associated Press reports.

Ann Garrett, assistant regional administrator of the National Marine Fisheries Service's protected resources division for the Pacific Islands, told AP the dolphins are constantly on high alert because people are always approaching them, and scientists are afraid the stress might interfere with their ability to reproduce. The agency won't make a final decision on a ban until next year, but Garrett says if it is enacted, it won't put people out of business. "They could still do snorkeling for other reasons — it's just not setting their people within a pod of dolphins or within 50 yards of a dolphin," she said. Catherine Garcia

August 23, 2016
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North Korea fired a submarine-launched ballistic missile early Wednesday morning off its east coast, South Korea's Yonhap news agency reports.

In July, South Korea said an attempted launch by North Korea failed in its initial flight stage. Yonhap reports the missile landed inside Japan's Air Defense Identification Zone, and a U.S. official said the missile made it 300 miles before it crashed into the sea. The United Nations has banned North Korea from any use of ballistic missiles, and the launch comes just a few days after the start of annual military exercises between the United States and South Korea. Pyongyang believes the exercises are rehearsal for an invasion, and vowed retaliation. In January, North Korea conducted its fourth nuclear test, and said it was the first time the country used a hydrogen bomb. Catherine Garcia

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