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February 23, 2016
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In the summer of 2014, as Flint, Michigan, was drinking contaminated water, an outbreak of Legionnaires' disease started spreading through the area, sickening at least 87 people and killing nine between June 2014 and October 2015. Michigan health officials did not tell Flint residents about the outbreak until last month, not even in a warning to health providers, and county and state emails show a pattern similar to the silence and inertia that marked the water crisis, The New York Times reports.

Legionnaire's disease is an extreme form of pneumonia caused by a bacteria that can multiply in water systems, and while county officials suggested a link between the outbreak and the switch to Flint River water as early as October 2014, no connection can be conclusively drawn because samples weren't collected from ill residents. Jane Stout, an expert on the disease at the University of Pittsburgh, told The Times she believes that the combination of corrosion in the city pipes and summer heat allowed the Legionella bacteria to flourish in the city's water supply, especially in building distribution systems.

"What gets me is how fast the state has just denied — 'We can’t prove it's the water,'" said Tim Monahan, who survived the outbreak in Flint. "I think they're so afraid of tying nine deaths to this. The whole thing is just such a ridiculous tragedy." Peter Weber

October 17, 2017

They rescued her, and on Sunday, Nala returned the favor.

Nala, a boxer dog, was walking with her owners in their Lancaster, California, neighborhood on Sunday, when she jumped in front of them, protecting Cole Lewis, 10, and his mother from a Mojave green rattlesnake. "She waited until we were safe," Cole told ABC Los Angeles. "She stood her ground. She didn't whimper or anything when she got bit."

The snake bit Nala on the nose, making her bleed. Cole's stepfather, Anthony Borquez, knew that the faster you get help for a poisonous bite, the greater the chance of survival, and Nala was rushed to the vet. Nala got there in time, and is expected to go home soon. "She saved my life, and I just want to hang out with her now because she's my hero," Cole said. Catherine Garcia

October 17, 2017

A Florida congresswoman is upset over a comment President Trump made to the widow of U.S. Army Sgt. La David Johnson, one of the four troops killed earlier this month when they were ambushed by Islamist militants in Niger.

Rep. Frederica Wilson (D) told Local 10 News that Trump called Myeshia Johnson on Tuesday afternoon and they spoke for about five minutes, with Trump at one point telling Johnson: "He knew what he signed up for ... but when it happens it hurts anyway." "Yes, he said it," Wilson said. "It's so insensitive. He should have not said that. He shouldn't have said it." Myeshia Johnson is pregnant and due in January, and has two other children with her late husband, a 6-year-old daughter and 2-year-old son. After the phone call with Trump, Myeshia Johnson, her family, and friends went to Miami International Airport to wait for the Delta flight to arrive carrying her husband's flag-covered casket.

La David Johnson, 25, was a Walmart employee before becoming a member of the 3rd Special Forces Group at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. Details surrounding the ambush that killed him on Oct. 4 are still murky, but the troops reportedly did not have any air cover and were in unarmored trucks when the attack took place. Trump has come under fire for not saying anything about the deaths or the botched mission, and he tried to turn things around by erroneously telling reporters that former President Barack Obama didn't call the families of fallen troops; he later tried to backtrack, saying Obama "probably did sometimes" call and "maybe sometimes he didn't. I don't know. That's what I was told." Catherine Garcia

October 17, 2017
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Philando Castile would often reach into his own pocket to pay for student lunches when the children didn't have enough money to cover the cost, and in remembrance of the nutrition services supervisor, a memorial fund has been set up that aims to wipe out all student lunch debt in Minnesota.

Philando Feeds the Children was set up by a local college professor, with the goal of raising $5,000 to take care of the lunch debt of children in the St. Paul area. By Tuesday night, $77,000 has been raised, and the goal has been increased to $100,000 to try to pay every debt in the state. In 2016, Castile was shot and killed by police officer Jeronimo Yanez in an incident that was captured on tape and sparked protests.

Castile worked at J.J. Hill Montessori School, and on Friday, his mother, Valerie, dropped off the first check to cover lunch debt. "This project means the world to me," she told the Star Tribune. Stacy Koppen, director of nutrition services at St. Paul Public Schools, said it costs on average $400 a year for one student's lunch, and Philando Feeds the Children will make it easier for parents who don't make a lot of money, but also don't qualify for free or reduced meals. "This fund really speaks to exactly who Philando Castile was as a passionate school nutrition leader," Koppen told NBC News. Catherine Garcia

October 17, 2017
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On Tuesday, less than a week after he was accused of sexually harassing a producer he worked with and suspended by the company, Amazon Studios head Roy Price resigned, the studio confirmed to USA Today.

The Man in the High Castle producer Isa Hackett says that in 2015, Price repeatedly harassed and propositioned her, and after she rebuffed his advances, she told Amazon about what was happening. Price's resignation comes after dozens of women accused powerful Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein of sexual harassment and assault. Catherine Garcia

October 17, 2017
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Former White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer spent most of Monday being interviewed by members of Special Counsel Robert Mueller's team, several people familiar with the meeting told Politico Tuesday.

One person with knowledge of the interview said Spicer was asked about President Trump's firing of former FBI Director James Comey, the statements he made about the firing, and Trump's meetings with Russian officials like Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov. The interview was part of Mueller's investigation into Russia's potential meddling in the 2016 presidential election.

Spicer is a former Republican National Committee spokesman, and during the general election he was part of Trump's team working out of Trump Tower. Trump's former chief of staff, Reince Priebus, another RNC official who left to join the Trump administration, met with Mueller on Friday. Spicer declined to comment to Politico on the report. Catherine Garcia

October 17, 2017
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President Trump gave himself a pat on the back during an interview Tuesday, taking credit for the Islamic State "giving up." U.S.-backed forces liberated Raqqa, Syria, on Tuesday, seizing ISIS's de facto capital, and Trump declared his strong leadership was the reason.

During the interview on The Chris Plante Show, a talk show hosted by Plante and broadcast in Washington, D.C., Trump claimed that the U.S. was losing the war on terror before his administration took charge. CNN notes that Trump has applauded himself before for efforts against ISIS, glossing over the fact that operations in Iraq and Syria began under former President Barack Obama.

"I totally changed rules of engagement. I totally changed our military, I totally changed the attitudes of the military and they have done a fantastic job," Trump said. "ISIS is now giving up, they are giving up, they are raising their hands, they are walking off. Nobody has ever seen that before."

Plante asked why that hadn't happened before, and Trump didn't hesitate with his self-congratulatory answer.

"Because you didn't have Trump as your president," he said. "It was a big difference, there was a big, big difference if you look at the military now." Summer Meza

October 17, 2017

Google Maps received swift social media backlash for a test feature that showed you how many calories you'd burn if you walked to your destination. The feature was pulled Monday night, and Google confirmed to BuzzFeed News that it was removed in direct response to the negative feedback.

The feature, which was developed for iOS only, showed not only the number of calories a user could burn by walking, but also put the walk in terms of mini cupcakes. This was particularly troubling for some users, who felt it played into unhealthy attitudes about food and exercise. One of the main complaints was that the feature could be harmful for users dealing with eating disorders, as calorie-counting is a controversial practice in the nutrition world, and some have argued that a fixation on numbers can lead to an unhealthy obsession.

"For some people, that's not an issue at all," said Claire Mysko, the chief executive of the National Eating Disorders Association in an interview with The New York Times. "But for people who are hyper-focused on numbers, that can feel very oppressive to see calorie counts everywhere when you're trying to shift your relationship with food."

While some viewed Google Maps' cupcake feature as an attempt to promote healthy habits, the short-lived experiment will not be returning for iPhone users. Summer Meza

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