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November 22, 2017

The Trump Organization is walking away from its struggling hotel in Manhattan's SoHo neighborhood, The New York Times reports. It is the second hotel the organization has removed its name from this year, after a similar situation developed in Toronto.

The SoHo building, which also has condominiums, closed its main restaurant earlier this year due to a decline in business "since the election," in the words of one of its lawyers. The owner of the building, the CIM Group, reportedly reached a deal to buy out the Trump Organization from the property; the Trump company manages daily operations at the building. "The Board and CIM have been first class in every regard," said the CEO of Trump Hotels, Eric Danziger, in a statement. "We have truly enjoyed our relationship and look forward to exploring new opportunities in the future."

On Monday, The Telegraph reported that the average price for a weekend at a Trump hotel dropped by 36 percent in the last year. Jeva Lange

1:08a.m.

The Miami Herald on Sunday endorsed Democrat Andrew Gillum for governor, saying he's the "best candidate to pull Florida back to center."

The editorial board has a lot of faith in Gillum, the mayor of the state capital, Tallahassee. Gillum will ensure that "the middle class and working class don't continue to bear the brunt of Tallahassee's misguided spending," the editorial said, and will also put public schools back "in the spotlight," will help those denied health insurance, and will "fight against sea-level rise and the degradation of the environment."

The Republican candidate, former Rep. Ron DeSantis, is "using worn-out fear tactics to win votes," and voters should "really be alarmed at DeSantis' close proximity to supporters and contributors who have made racist comments, especially at the candidate's campaign appearances." In contrast, Gillum has conducted an "all-embracing, optimistic, and engaging campaign throughout the state," the editorial board said, and that's "another quality that speaks well of the state leader he would be."

The board believes that "after eight years of misplaced priorities, it's time to swing the pendulum back, back to a Florida that works for more of us, that builds on its prosperity and that doesn't squander its more precious resources, be they fiscal, environmental, or human." Read more of the Herald's endorsement of Gillum here. Catherine Garcia

12:48a.m.

President Trump has apparently managed to make people very excited to vote in midterm elections. The percentage of voters with a high interest in the election — a 9 or 10 on a 10-point scale — has jumped to 65 percent, according to a NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll released Sunday, the highest numbers ever recorded in the poll. A record-hight 72 percent of Democrats and 68 percent of Republicans are very interested, versus 46 percent among independents.

Overall, 50 percent of likely voters want Democrats to control Congress versus 41 percent who favor Republicans, an improvement of 1 percentage point for Democrats since the September survey. Unusually for a midterm election, Democrats fare better among likely voters than the overall electorate, where they hold a 48-41 percent advantage, down from 12-points in the September survey. The percentage of engaged Latino and young voters, two groups that skew Democratic, has jumped by double digits from previous NBC/WSJ polls. Women favor Democrats by 25 points.

"Although Democrats are preferred in the national poll overall, their advantage has vanished in the House districts that matter most," The Wall Street Journal reports. And as Republican interest in the midterms has jumped, so have Trump's poll numbers — he gets his best job approval number to date in the poll, with 47 percent approving and 49 percent disapproving. Among likely voters, 45 percent approve of Trump and 52 percent disapprove.

The "blue wave" has run into a "riptide of uncertainty" from the "surge of Republican intensity," said Democratic pollster Fred Yang. Republican pollster Bill McInturff, who conducted the poll with Yang, called the election "a barnburner." Republicans are in a better position, he added, but "you've got to look where the tilt is going. And the tilt didn't change." NBC's Chuck Todd says the data point to a "choose your own adventure" election:

The poll was conducted via telephone Oct. 14-17 among 900 registered voters and 645 likely voters, with an overall margin of error of ±3.3 percentage points, ±3.9 points among likely voters. Peter Weber

12:45a.m.

Florida's gubernatorial candidates — Democrat Andrew Gillum and Republican Ron DeSantis — faced off in a debate Sunday in Tampa, moderated by CNN's Jake Tapper, and they touched on everything from race to climate change to school safety.

On the environment and climate change: DeSantis said he "ran in the Republican primary stressing the need for clean water," but he doesn't "want to be an alarmist" on climate change, and "I want to look at this and do what makes sense for Florida." Gillum said when he's elected, Floridians will "have a governor who believes in science, which we haven't had for quite some time in this state." After DeSantis said Gillum wants to enact a "California-style energy policy," he responded, "I'm not so sure what's so California about believing that the state of Florida ought to lead in solar energy. We're known as the Sunshine State."

On school shootings: Tapper mentioned that after the deadly shooting earlier this year in Parkland, Florida, Gov. Rick Scott (R) signed legislation that, among other things, raised the minimum age to purchase a firearm, and he asked DeSantis why he said he'd have vetoed that bill. "We are gonna fix it in terms of school security," DeSantis said, adding he's a "big supporter of school security." Gillum said DeSantis was against the legislation because "he is wholly owned by the NRA. He's not gonna stand up to the National Rifle Association."

On race: DeSantis received criticism after he used the phrase "monkey this up" in regards to Gillum and did not return money to a donor who used a racial slur. He said on Sunday he will be "a governor for all Floridians, that's the only way you can do it." Gillum said that throughout the race, DeSantis has done everything "to draw all the attention he can to the color of my skin," and the "'monkey up' comment said it all." Catherine Garcia

October 21, 2018

Julia Louis-Dreyfus was celebrated on Sunday as she received the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor, becoming the 21st person the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts has recognized with the award.

The acclaimed Emmy-award winning comedic actress, best known for starring in Seinfeld and Veep, was praised by 2010 Mark Twain recipient Tina Fey, who lauded Louis-Dreyfus for her "secret precision" and commitment to making her Seinfeld character Elaine Benes flawed. "Julia let Elaine be selfish and petty and sarcastic and a terrible, terrible dancer," she said.

Before the event, Louis-Dreyfus told The Associated Press she remembers when she realized she could crack people up. "The first time I really knew was when I stuffed raisins in my nose and my mother laughed," she said. "I ended up in the emergency room because they wouldn't come out." PBS will air the ceremony on Nov. 19. Catherine Garcia

October 21, 2018

On Sunday, Hurricane Willa strengthened into a Category 4 storm, and is expected to make landfall on the Pacific coast of Mexico by Tuesday.

Willa now has maximum sustained winds of 130 mph, and is about 220 miles south-southwest of Cabo Corrientes. A hurricane watch is now in effect for the shore between Mazatlan and San Blas, and forecasters are warning Willa could produce dangerous storm surge and dump as much as 10 inches of rain in some parts of western Jalisco, western Nayarit, and southern Sinaloa states. Catherine Garcia

October 21, 2018

Over the last month, Special Counsel Robert Mueller's team has been diligently following up on leads regarding Roger Stone and whether he was in communication with WikiLeaks and its founder, Julian Assange, during the 2016 presidential election, several people familiar with the matter told The Washington Post on Sunday.

Stone, one of President Trump's longtime advisers, bragged during the campaign about his ability to get in touch with Assange, and he predicted future leaks from Assange's website. Now, prosecutors are looking at those comments, as well as private conversations he allegedly had with associates about his connection to Assange, to determine whether he knew in advance that WikiLeaks was going to publish emails hacked from Democrats, the Post reports.

In July, the special counsel filed charges laying out how Russian military intelligence officers created the online persona Guccifer 2.0 to spread the hacked emails through WikiLeaks, and used the Guccifer 2.0 Twitter account to exchange messages with Stone; Stone said those conversations were innocent.

Stone told the Post his only connection to WikiLeaks was through former friend Randy Credico, who had Assange on his radio show in 2016. A person familiar with the probe said Credico told Mueller's grand jury that in 2016, Stone told him he had a secret back channel to WikiLeaks. Mueller is also digging into Stone's relationship with Jerome Corsi, a conservative writer for a website centering around conspiracy theories, and whether he was the contact between Stone and WikiLeaks, the Post reports. Catherine Garcia

October 21, 2018

The Department of Health and Human Services is considering establishing under Title IX a legal definition of gender as a biological condition determined by a person's genitalia at birth, The New York Times reports.

Title IX protects people from discrimination based on sex in education programs or activities that receive financial assistance from the federal government. The Times obtained a memo, written in the spring, that calls on several government agencies to adopt a single definition of gender "on a biological basis that is clear, grounded in science, objective, and administrable." In the memo, the department said the sex listed on a "person's birth certificate, as originally issued, shall constitute definitive proof of a person's sex unless rebutted by reliable genetic evidence."

The Obama administration had loosened the legal concept of gender in federal programs, and if this legal definition proposed by the Trump administration is approved, an estimated 1.4 million Americans who identify as a gender other than the one they were born into may lose federal recognition.

Roger Severino, the director of the Office for Civil Rights at the Department of Health and Human Services, would not answer questions from the Times about the memo. During the Obama administration, he was head of the DeVos Center for Religion and Civil Society at the Heritage Foundation, and was upset by the administration's expansion of sex to include gender identity, the Times reports. Catherine Garcia

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