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July 10, 2018

It's always the emails.

While Judge Brett Kavanaugh, President Trump's Supreme Court nominee to replace the retiring Anthony Kennedy, worked as an aide to former President George W. Bush, he produced tens of thousands of emails and memos that are public record. But Fix the Court, a Supreme Court watchdog group, said Monday that the documents are being withheld by the Department of Justice.

The group filed requests in 2017 to see "more than a million" documents from Kavanaugh's five years in the Bush White House, but the DOJ and the National Archives and Records Administration, tasked with preserving government records, hasn't released them. When Supreme Court Justice Elena Kagan was first nominated to her seat, Talking Points Memo points out, all of her documents from her time working under former President Bill Clinton were published online. Those public records became a part of the debate over her eventual confirmation.

All of Kavanaugh's public records, including documents from his time as a law clerk for Kennedy, should have been released by now, according to Freedom of Information laws. Fix the Court on Tuesday sued the federal government to uncover the records, criticizing officials as making it "as difficult as possible to obtain public records from Supreme Court nominees." The group urged the Trump administration to release Kavanaugh's documents immediately, "so the American people and their representatives in the Senate can make a more informed judgment on the nominee." Summer Meza

12:51a.m.

At a rally in Houston Monday night, President Trump declared he's a "nationalist," and urged his supporters to "use that word."

Trump was in Texas to campaign for Sen. Ted Cruz (R), who is running against Democratic challenger Beto O'Rourke. "You know, they have a word, it sort of became old-fashioned," Trump said. "It's called a nationalist. And I say, 'Really? We're not supposed to use that world.' You know what I am? I'm a nationalist. Okay? I'm a nationalist." As the crowd cheered him on, Trump said, "use that word. Use that word."

The Democrats, he said, "want to turn back the clock. Restore the rule of corrupt, power-hungry globalists. You know what a globalist is, right? A globalist is a person that wants the globe to do well, frankly not caring about our country so much. And you know what? We can't have that." Watch the video below. Catherine Garcia

12:24a.m.

On Monday, President Trump vaguely elaborated on a 10 percent tax cut for middle-income earners that nobody else seems to know anything about. Trump's proposal for a "major tax cut" before the Nov. 6 election or soon after is "mystifying White House officials, congressional leaders, and tax wonks around town who mostly have no idea what he's talking about," Politico reports.

At a rally in Houston on Monday evening, Trump said he has been working on the proposal with House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Kevin Brady (R-Texas) for several months, and he's said House Speaker Paul Ryan's office was involved, too. But Ryan and Brady "appeared caught off guard again by Trump's comments," and their offices referred questions back to the White House, The Washington Post reports.

Congress is on break until after the election, "legislation enacting such a cut has not been planned on Capitol Hill, and congressional Republicans were privately skeptical that a vote could happen during the post-election lame duck session," the Post reports. "There are no current plans in Congress for any kind of large new tax cut for the middle class," Politico adds, and a 10 percent cut, as Trump is talking about, would cost about $2 trillion over 10 years, according to Jason Furman, chairman of former President Barack Obama's Council of Economic Advisers.

"The GOP is already scrambling to avoid criticism for the ballooning debt and deficit under Trump's watch," and Republican candidates scrapped plans to run on the $1.5 trillion tax cut they already passed months ago, Politico says. "The specifics may not matter, though, in the days before an election — especially as the media echoes his message, often uncritically." And Republicans seem fine with that. "It's not a serious proposal," one well-connected conservative lobbyist tells Politico. "Nobody is taking it seriously, but we'd rather have him talking about tax cuts than some of the crazy stuff he usually talks about." Peter Weber

October 22, 2018

Without the generosity of a stranger, Halie Hipsher and Matt Jones would not have been able to move their wedding up to ensure that her grandfather could attend the joyous day.

The stranger, Kolbie Sanders of Tyler, Texas, was set to get married on Oct. 20 at the Belle Vue Wedding and Event Venue. The wedding was called off, but she wasn't going to be able to get the $3,500 rental fee back. The venue told her she could pick a new date and hold a different event, but Sanders had another idea: She went on Facebook and announced she was giving away the venue to a couple that wanted to get married on the 20th. Messages came flooding in, and after whittling down the couples, she put names in a bowl and picked one slip of paper.

Sanders chose Jones and Hipsher, who had told her they planned on getting married in fall 2019, but Hipsher was afraid her grandfather, who has stage 4 pancreatic cancer, might not make it another year. Hipsher and Jones jumped into planning mode, and a photographer and other vendors donated their services. "Walking down the aisle was breathtaking and I wouldn't want to change one second of the day because it is all I dreamed of and more," Hipsher told Good Morning America. Sanders, who stopped by the wedding for photos with Hipsher and her grandfather, said she was thrilled when the bride won, and her "reaction definitely made all of this worth it." Catherine Garcia

October 22, 2018

President Trump better hope the man he once dubbed Lyin' Ted was telling the truth on Monday night, when he declared that "in 2020, Donald Trump will be overwhelmingly re-elected."

Trump was in Houston for a campaign rally in support of Sen. Ted Cruz (R), up for re-election and facing Democrat Beto O'Rourke. Cruz touted his record and accused his opponent of being soft on immigration, The Associated Press reports, but his line about Trump gave him his biggest cheers of the night.

As for Trump, he said Cruz supported him in his quest to cut taxes and regulations, and shared that Cruz has "become a really good friend of mine." Onstage, they patted each other on the back, and it was almost as if 2016 — when Trump ridiculed Cruz's wife's appearance, accused his father of being involved in the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, said he was "choking like a dog" in the Republican presidential primary, and anointed him "Lyin' Ted," while Cruz called Trump "utterly amoral," "a pathological liar," a "sniveling coward," and "narcissist at a level I don't think the country's ever seen" — never happened. Catherine Garcia

October 22, 2018

Despite a federal judge ordering in July that the U.S. government stop giving undocumented children in migrant shelters psychotropic medications, the practice is continuing, civil rights attorneys said in a court filing on Friday.

Attorneys from the Center for Human Rights and Constitutional Law said that children at the Shiloh Residential Treatment Center in Texas and other migrant shelters run by the federal Office of Refugee Resettlement say they are still being administered "psychotropic drugs without informed parental consent or court order." The government is "almost certainly not complying" with a California federal judge's July 30 order, the lawyers said, offering written statements from four children and one child's aunt about the medication they are being given inside Shiloh.

A 17-year-old whose name was redacted said they are given three medications in the morning, including Zoloft, and four at night. The teen sees a doctor every two weeks, and "he tells me the drugs I need to take, but doesn't explain why," the teenager wrote on Oct. 18. "The drugs make me feel really tired and sluggish. I have trouble concentrating in class. Sometimes I have stomach pain and a lot of headaches. Sometimes I feel numb on one side of my body. I tell the doctor about these problems, and he says it is all normal." The Department of Health and Human Services, which oversees the Office of Refugee Resettlement, told CBS News the agency will submit a reply to the court filing on Friday. Catherine Garcia

October 22, 2018

Monday was the first day of early voting in Texas, and lines were already forming well before dawn.

At one Houston polling place, thousands of people waited hours for doors to open, including Cody Pogue, who arrived at 8:30 p.m. Sunday night. Pogue wanted to be one of the first people in the state to vote for Democratic Senate candidate Rep. Beto O'Rourke, telling the Houston Chronicle this is "one of the most important elections of our lifetime."

Voter registration is at a record high of more than 15.7 million voters, with about 400,000 people added to the rolls between the March primary and the last day of voter registration this month, the Chronicle reports. Much of the excitement is due to the Senate race between O'Rourke and Sen. Ted Cruz (R). On Tuesday afternoon, the Texas Secretary of State's office will release Monday's early voting numbers. Catherine Garcia

October 22, 2018

In either late 2017 or early 2018, murdered journalist Jamal Khashoggi met with Prince Khalid bin Salman, the Saudi ambassador to the United States and younger brother of Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, while at Saudi Arabia's embassy in Washington, several people with knowledge of the meeting told NBC News on Monday.

Khashoggi was at the embassy to take care of a routine matter, and after he was recognized by officials, they called the ambassador's office, and he was invited up to meet with him, two friends of Khashoggi's said. It was a friendly meeting, he told them, which lasted about 30 minutes. The embassy confirmed the meeting happened, but it's not clear what they discussed.

Saudi Arabia had been pushing for Khashoggi to return; the journalist was critical of some of the government's decisions, and had left to live in the United States. Khashoggi's friends said he had not only been contacted by Prince Khalid but also one of the crown prince's top aides, Saud al-Qahtani, about a high-ranking job in the royal court, but Khashoggi was wary of the overtures, afraid he was being tricked and would be punished upon his return to Saudi Arabia. Four people with knowledge of how Saudi intelligence operates told NBC News that for years, the plan has been to negotiate with dissidents in an attempt to get them back to the kingdom.

Khashoggi was killed inside the Saudi consulate in Istanbul on Oct. 2, with Saudi Arabia only admitting he was dead on Friday, after Turkish officials said for weeks he had been murdered within hours of his arrival at the consulate. Saudi Arabia claims he was killed in a fight, and Qahtani has been fired for his role in the "rogue operation." After Khashoggi was reported missing, Prince Khalid went back to Saudi Arabia, and has yet to return to the U.S. Catherine Garcia

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