March 10, 2018
George Frey/Getty Images

The Department of Justice on Saturday posted a notice of a regulatory proposal to ban bump stocks, the modification for semi-automatic weapons that permitted the Las Vegas attacker to shoot about 500 people in 10 minutes in October. The DOJ seeks to change the legal "definition of 'machinegun' in the National Firearms Act and Gun Control Act [to include] bump stock type devices," which would effect a ban.

That change would also reverse an Obama-era determination of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) that bump stocks do not fit the machine gun definition and thus cannot be prohibited without new legislation from Congress. Some ATF officials believe that 2010 decision was correct and the Trump administration does not have legal authority to proceed with this ban, the Chicago Tribune reports.

"President Trump is absolutely committed to ensuring the safety and security of every American," Attorney General Jeff Sessions said in the DOJ notice, "and he has directed us to propose a regulation addressing bump stocks." Trump has supported a variety of new gun control measures in the wake of the deadly school shooting in Parkland, Florida, but his allies and critics alike remain uncertain about the reliability of his stance. Bonnie Kristian

February 27, 2018

White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders confirmed Tuesday that President Trump "supports raising the age limit to 21 for the purchase of certain firearms," despite the NRA rejecting the proposal over the weekend.

While Sanders declined to go into specifics, she had said Monday that "the president is planning a meeting for Wednesday with bipartisan members of Congress ... to discuss different pieces of legislation and what they can do moving forward." She anticipated "some specific policy proposals later this week."

Questions about Trump's resolve arose after a congressional source told CNN on Monday that the president is "moving back" from the idea of raising the age limit. The debate follows the deaths of 17 students and teachers at a Parkland, Florida, high school at the hands of a 19-year-old gunman who legally purchased an AR-15.

"Half of you are afraid of the NRA," Trump told state governors at the White House on Monday, urging: "We have to fight them every once in a while — that's okay." Jeva Lange

February 26, 2018
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Lawmakers return to Capitol Hill on Monday after a week-long recess under intensifying pressure to enact gun-control legislation in response to the shooting that left 17 students and teachers dead at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, The Hill reports. Politicians in both parties have recognized that Congress will need to address demands from students and others for measures to make schools safer, including tougher gun laws, but so far there has been no consensus on what to do. Sen. Pat Toomey (R-Pa.) said Sunday he planned to renew a push with Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.) to expand background checks for commercial gun sales, but he said he was "skeptical" about proposals to raise the minimum age for buying civilian versions of military-style rifles like the AR-15. Harold Maass

February 19, 2018

Dozens of teenagers participated in a "lie-in" outside of the White House on Monday, calling for stricter gun laws and an end to school shootings like the massacre last week at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida, which left 17 dead and 15 injured.

Embed from Getty Images

The protest was organized by a group called Teens for Gun Reform. On Facebook, the organizers said they wanted to "make a statement on the atrocities which have been committed due to the lack of gun control, and send a powerful message to our government that they must take action now." The teens stretched out on the sidewalk, remaining on the ground for just a few minutes "in order to symbolize how quickly someone, such as the [Florida] shooter, is able to purchase a gun in America," the group said.

Embed from Getty Images

Students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School have also mobilized, and they're planning a rally against school and gun violence, March for Our Lives, on March 24 in Washington, D.C., with sister events across the United States. "We're going to have, in every major city, somewhere that people all across the country can go to," student Brendan Duff told NPR. Students "want to feel engaged, and they want to do something to help. And this is it." Catherine Garcia

Embed from Getty Images

July 2, 2016
Rich Pedroncelli/Associated Press

California Gov. Jerry Brown signed six new gun control measures into law on Friday while vetoing five other gun-related bills he said were excessive in regulatory scope.

Among the bills Brown signed was one prohibiting possession of magazines that can hold more than 10 rounds of ammunition, as well as a ban on semiautomatic weapons with "bullet buttons," a feature that facilitates speedy reloading. Among those he rejected was one that expanded the definition of "firearm" in a way Brown found unacceptably vague.

As these things always go, Brown's decision was hailed by gun control supporters as "far-reaching and bold" and by gun rights advocates as a "draconian" exploitation of post-Orlando fears over mass shooters and terrorism. Bonnie Kristian

June 25, 2016
George Frey/Getty Images

Hawaii became the first state in the nation to automatically place all gun owners in an FBI criminal tracking database, which will enable the federal government to "monitor them for possible wrongdoing anywhere in the country." From now on, if a Hawaiian gun owner is arrested for any reason, their hometown police will be notified and their permission to own a gun reexamined.

"This bill has undergone a rigorous legal review process by our Attorney General’s office," said Hawaii Gov. David Ige, who signed the bill Thursday, "and we have determined that it is our responsibility to approve this measure for the sake of our children and families."

But critics say the new law is an extreme and invasive measure. "Why are law abiding citizens exercising their constitutional right being entered into a criminal database?" asked Hawaiian Quentin Kealoha in a public comment process about the bill. "Would you enter people exercising their right to free speech into a criminal database?" Bonnie Kristian

June 23, 2016
House Television via AP

At 2:30 a.m. on Thursday, Republicans gaveled the House back into session, pushing through a partisan bill to fund the fight against the Zika virus, voting to adjourn until after July 4, and trying to end a 16-hour sit-in by Democrats demanding a vote on a Senate bill that would prevent certain suspected terrorists from purchasing a gun. As of 3 a.m., Democrats were still giving speeches, led by Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.). More than 100 House Democrats participated in the sit-in, waving photos of victims of gun violence, singing "We Shall Overcome," and livestreaming their protest after House Speaker Paul Ryan ordered the C-SPAN cameras turned off.

"Democrats can continue to talk, but the reality is that they have no end-game strategy," said AshLee Strong, Ryan's press secretary, "and no stunts on the floor will change that." House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi accused Republicans of leaving town "in the middle of the night in a cowardly fashion."

Democrats oppose the House GOP's Zika bill because it falls well short of the $1.9 billion President Obama has requested to fight the virus, and because Republicans fund the bill by siphoning money from other programs, including ObamaCare. Congress now won't act on Zika funding until after the July 4 recess. During Ryan's earlier attempt to shut down the sit-in, at 10 p.m. on Wednesday, Democrats blocked a Republican attempt to override Obama's veto of a measure to beat back new rules for financial advisers. Peter Weber

June 21, 2016
Win McNamee/Getty Images

The Senate rejected four gun control measures Monday in a move the White House lambasted as a "shameful display of cowardice." Senators "continue to protect a loophole to allow individuals suspected of terrorism to buy a gun," press secretary Josh Earnest said on CNN on Tuesday, referring to one of the blocked measures. "Right now, according to loopholes protected by Republicans, those individuals can walk into a gun store and buy a gun."

Earnest emphasized that the Obama administration is not interested in hampering Second Amendment rights, or in preventing the military and law enforcement from being "well-armed," but rather in closing a loophole that "doesn't make any sense." "We're not suggesting that a law-abiding American citizen should not be able to buy a gun," Earnest said. "We believe our military should be well-armed. We believe our law enforcement should be well-armed. We don't believe we're going to pass a law that's going to prevent every act of gun violence."

The Senate's votes Monday came just a week after a mass shooting in Orlando killed 49 people at an LGBT nightclub. The voting was largely split along party lines. Two of the measures called for the expansion of background checks, and the other two addressed preventing terrorism watch list suspects from getting ahold of guns. Becca Stanek

See More Speed Reads