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July 20, 2018

President Trump started his Thursday off by tweeting that his summit with Russian President Vladimir Putin on Monday "was a great success, except with the real enemy of the people, the Fake News Media," a statement that CNN's Chris Cuomo called "ugly" and "unoriginal," but "most importantly ... an admission that you hate your country."

The phrase "real enemy of the people" was used as an "operative threat to murder the opposition during the French Revolution," Cuomo said. Joseph Stalin and Mao Zedong both used it, too, he said, adding, "America, the country you lead, was formed in defiance of strongmen, bullies, and the idea that might makes right. A free press is a metaphor for what makes America great, so you have now admitted that you are against what we are all about."

Cuomo isn't concerned over Trump's tweet, because he knows the media is not the enemy, and is "perhaps the best check against the abuse of power that can lead to a Stalin or a Mao." The person who should be worried is Trump, Cuomo said, because "do you really think the people will keep a president who hates what their country is all about?" Watch the video below. Catherine Garcia

December 25, 2016
REUTERS/Carlos Barria

The United Nations Security Council on Friday voted against Israeli settlement construction on Palestinian land, with the United States abstaining. That decision has led to outcry in America and Israel alike from those who seek to maintain the two nations' special relationship. "The big loss yesterday for Israel in the United Nations will make it much harder to negotiate peace," President-elect Donald Trump tweeted Saturday. "Too bad, but we will get it done anyway!" Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu called the vote a "shameful anti-Israel ambush" perpetrated by the Obama administration. And Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) announced he will introduce a measure to pull U.S. funding from the U.N. unless the measure is repealed. Bonnie Kristian

December 4, 2016
Atta Kenare/Getty Images

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani on Sunday urged President Obama to reject a bill extending sanctions on Iran which passed the U.S. Senate on Thursday in a 99-0 vote.

"America's president is obliged to exercise his authority by preventing [the bill's] approval and particularly its implementation," Rouhani said in a parliamentary speech, "and if this gross violation is carried out we will firmly respond."

The White House has said it does not believe the sanctions violate the Iran deal, as Rouhani claims, and Obama is expected to sign the bill. If approved, the extended Iran Sanctions Act will permit the president stop investment in key Iranian industries, including its energy sector. President-elect Donald Trump has expressed dissatisfaction with "terrible" Iran deal, promising to renegotiate it on better terms for the United States. Bonnie Kristian

July 15, 2015
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During a lengthy press conference on Wednesday, President Obama said that while he fully expects a "robust" domestic debate over his nuclear deal with Iran, there were only two options in preventing Iran from creating a bomb: diplomacy, or force. "We cut off every single one of Iran's pathways to a nuclear program," Obama said. "Without a deal, those pathways would remain open."

The president also challenged his critics to read the Iran deal themselves and respond to facts rather than misinformation, while redoubling his promise to keep pressure on Iran for terrorism and human rights violations. "No one has presented to me or the American people a better alternative," he said. "I am hearing a lot of talk that this is a bad deal. … What I haven't heard is what is your preferred alternative."

Congress has 60 days to review the deal; Obama has vowed to veto any legislation that prevents the successful implementation of the agreement, which restricts Iran's nuclear capabilities in exchange for lifting punishing sanctions on Tehran. Jeva Lange