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September 21, 2018
Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Republican activist Steven Alembik wants the world to know he's not a racist, and he used a bunch of slurs to prove it.

On Sept. 8, Alembik tweeted that former President Barack Obama is a "F---ing MUSLIM N----r." When asked about this tweet by Politico on Wednesday, he at first said he didn't think he wrote it. After looking at the tweet, which he deleted after speaking to Politico, Alembik acknowledged he used the N-word after Obama made an unflattering remark about the Republican Party. But he is not a racist, Alembik explained. "When I write anything inflammatory, it's because I'm seriously pissed off. I'm an emotional human being."

On the apparent theory that digging a gigantic hole is better than a small one, Alembik kept talking. "So somebody like Chris Rock can get up onstage and use the word and there's no problem?" he asked. "But some white guy says it and he's a racist? Really?" Alembik grew up in New York in the '50s, he told Politico, and then proceeded to use a string of racial slurs against Jews, blacks, and Latinos to show that back in the good old days, everyone was calling each other names based on their religion and ethnicity.

Alembik has donated more than $22,000 over the years to Ron DeSantis, Florida's Republican gubernatorial nominee, and hooked DeSantis up with a speech at Mar-a-Lago. In a statement to Politico, campaign spokesman Stephen Lawson called the tweet "disgusting rhetoric" and said DeSantis condemned it. When asked by The Associated Press if DeSantis would return any of the money he received from Alembik, Lawson said no, it has already been spent, but DeSantis will not accept any additional donations from him. For more on Alembik and DeSantis' own controversial statements, visit Politico. Catherine Garcia

March 2, 2018

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross dismissed concerns about Americans paying higher prices for cars as a result of President Trump's steel tariff as "no big deal" in comments that are widely being slammed as "tone deaf" and "out of touch."

Ross argued that one ton of steel costs about $700, and there is about one ton of steel in a car, "so 25 percent on that would be one half of 1 percent price increase on the typical $35,000 car. So it's no big deal."

People weren't sold:

Additionally, while the average price of a new car is around $33,000, most Americans cannot afford that.

To be fair, to Ross it probably is crumbs: He is worth $860 million, and trotted out to Trump's State of the Union in custom $500 slippers emblazoned with the Commerce Department's logo. Watch more of his comments on CNBC below. Jeva Lange