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June 11, 2018
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President Trump dropped a bomb on Twitter right before his meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un: that his top White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow suffered a heart attack and was being treated at Walter Reed Medical Center.

The Washington Post's Robert Costa reports that friends of Kudlow learned about his heart attack via Twitter, and began "rushing to the hospital, trying to reach his wife, Judy." The White House did not release any information on his condition, and rumors began to swirl, before Costa was able to reach Judy Kudlow. She told him that her husband is "doing fine. Doctors here are fabulous."

Two people close to Kudlow later told Costa he's "up and talking tonight" and has been making phone calls with doctors. Kudlow, 70, became the director of the National Economic Council earlier this year, and on Sunday, made waves when he accused Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau of "stab[bing] us in the back" by undermining Trump ahead of his talks with Kim.

UPDATE 10:32 p.m. ET: White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders released more information on Kudlow's condition, saying that his doctors are describing his heart attack as being "very mild." Catherine Garcia

February 22, 2018

Not everyone could cause Snap to lose $1.5 billion in market value with a single tweet, but then again, not everyone is Kylie Jenner. The 20-year-old's declaration Wednesday that she does not open Snapchat anymore potentially caused a slide Thursday that found shares tumbling more than 7 percent, ZeroHedge reports, effectively erasing "most" of the social media company's "post-earnings climb."

Snapchat infuriated users with an update earlier this month, which prompted more than a million people to sign a petition called "Remove the new Snapchat update."

"While the recent redesign of [Snap's] flagship app could produce positive long-term benefits, [there is a] significant jump in negative app reviews since the redesign was pushed out a few weeks ago, which could result in a decline in users and user engagement, and could negatively impact financial results," Citigroup analysts Mark May and Hao Yan wrote, as reported by Markets Insider. Jeva Lange

March 8, 2015
Dan Kitwood/Getty Images.

Two California women did their best to prove the "ugly American" tourist stereotype on Saturday when they carved their initials into the Colosseum in Rome.

The women, ages 21 and 25, left their tour group and used a coin to carve a "J" and an "N", The Guardian reports. They were caught by security after they documented their crime by taking a selfie. The initials were about 3 inches high, on a wall that was restored during the 1800s. Defacing the Colosseum is strictly forbidden — if common sense doesn't stop a person, signs everywhere in English and Italian get the message across.

The Colosseum has six million visitors every year, and while most are able to spend time there without leaving their mark, three months ago a Russian tourist who was caught carving a 10-inch letter received a four month suspended prison sentence and a fine of €20,000 ($22,000). The Californians are set to face a judge soon. Catherine Garcia

December 12, 2014

The Peruvian government says it will prosecute Greenpeace activists who took part in a stunt that caused damage at the Nazca Lines.

The site is home to huge images of animals and plants created about 1,500 years ago, and considered very vulnerable; access is limited and people who visit have to wear special footwear, the BBC reports. In advance of the U.N. climate talks in Lima, about 20 Greenpeace members went near the lines and left behind cloth letters that read "Time for change, the future is renewable."

The government says the activists left footprints in the delicate ground, and will open a criminal investigation and do everything to prevent those responsible from leaving the country. "It's a true slap in the face at everything Peruvians consider sacred," Deputy Culture Minister Luis Jaime Castillo said. A legal advisor for Greenpeace said the organization was sorry and the stunt came across as "careless and crass." Catherine Garcia