The Week: Most Recent 2012-electionshttp://mobile.theweek.com/supertopic/index/93/2012-electionsMost recent posts.en-usFri, 15 Feb 2013 11:54:00 -0500http://theweek.comhttp://theweek.com/images/logo_theweek.pngMost Recent 2012-elections from THE WEEKFri, 15 Feb 2013 11:54:00 -0500Did Nate Silver tip the 2012 election to Obama?http://theweek.com/article/index/240227/did-nate-silver-tip-the-2012-election-to-obamahttp://theweek.com/article/index/240227/did-nate-silver-tip-the-2012-election-to-obama<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0091/45855_article_main/w/240/h/300/maybe-president-obama-owes-nate-silver-a-thank-you-note.jpg?209" /></P><p>Nate Silver was vilified by some Republicans and political journalists during the 2012 election, and embraced by Democrats looking for a fix of reassuring political news during rocky periods of President Obama's re-election bid. This week, the seemingly prophetic <em>New York Times</em>&ndash;employed political polling aggregator told an audience of students at Washington University in St. Louis that "the polls can certainly affect elections at times." They're not supposed to, Silver added, but some voters may "take the forecasts too seriously."</p><p>Then,&nbsp;says Michael Tabb at the Washington U. newspaper...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/240227/did-nate-silver-tip-the-2012-election-to-obama">More</a>By <a href="/author/peter-weber" ><span class="byline">Peter Weber</span></a>Fri, 15 Feb 2013 11:54:00 -0500The 9 worst political gaffes of 2012http://theweek.com/article/index/237523/the-9-worst-political-gaffes-of-2012http://theweek.com/article/index/237523/the-9-worst-political-gaffes-of-2012<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0082/41168_article_main/w/240/h/300/rep-todd-akin-r-mo-released-an-apology-video-after-he-was-slammed-for-comments-he-made-about.jpg?209" /></P><p>The arguably most damaging verbal flub of the 2012 election season &mdash; Mitt Romney's covertly recorded comments to wealthy donors that 47 percent of Americans are government-addicted moochers &mdash; wasn't even a classic inadvertent gaffe: He <em>meant</em> to say it, and even revisited the theme after he lost the presidential race, griping that President Obama won re-election by handing out "gifts" to young, minority, and female voters. But gaffes of a more traditional nature played an unusually active role in the 2012 election &mdash; starting long before the calendar flipped to 2012 &mdash; helping...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/237523/the-9-worst-political-gaffes-of-2012">More</a>By <a href="/author/peter-weber" ><span class="byline">Peter Weber</span></a>Fri, 28 Dec 2012 15:35:00 -0500Recall-mania: Why American voters are increasingly eager to oust lawmakershttp://theweek.com/article/index/238220/recall-mania-why-american-voters-are-increasingly-eager-to-oust-lawmakershttp://theweek.com/article/index/238220/recall-mania-why-american-voters-are-increasingly-eager-to-oust-lawmakers<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0088/44493_article_main/w/240/h/300/recall-walker-pins-sit-in-a-basket-in-the-rock-county-democratic-party-headquarters-on-june-4.jpg?209" /></P><p>While the multi-billion dollar presidential campaign sucked up most of the nation's attention this year, in scores of smaller elections across the country, voters took unprecedented action to force political changes of their own. In 2012, at least 168 elected officials faced recall votes. That appears to be an all-time record.</p><p class="p3">While Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker's recall was by far the most prominent &mdash; it was only the third time a governor has ever faced a recall in U.S. history, and the first time one survived such a vote &mdash; there were plenty of other noteworthy attempts to bounce officials...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/238220/recall-mania-why-american-voters-are-increasingly-eager-to-oust-lawmakers">More</a>By Joshua SpivakWed, 26 Dec 2012 08:35:00 -0500Was Mitt Romney's Jeep ad really the 'lie of the year'?http://theweek.com/article/index/237675/was-mitt-romneys-jeep-ad-really-the-lie-of-the-yearhttp://theweek.com/article/index/237675/was-mitt-romneys-jeep-ad-really-the-lie-of-the-year<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0088/44154_article_main/w/240/h/300/mitt-romneys-jeep-ad-brazenly-false-says-politifact.jpg?209" /></P><p class="p1">You lie! That's the message <em>Politifact</em> sent Mitt Romney today in billboard-size letters, proclaiming the defeated GOP candidate's controversial Jeep ad the "lie of the year."&nbsp;The commercial claimed that President Obama had "sold Chrysler to Italians who are going to build Jeeps in China" &mdash; all at the cost of American jobs. The false claim was furiously refuted by the Obama campaign, numerous media outlets, and Chrysler itself. At the time,&nbsp;<em>Politifact</em> gave the ad a "pants on fire" rating. <em>The Washington Post</em> said it was worth four Pinocchios. Yet the Romney campaign &mdash; which...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/237675/was-mitt-romneys-jeep-ad-really-the-lie-of-the-year">More</a>By <a href="/author/ryu-spaeth" ><span class="byline">Ryu Spaeth</span></a>Wed, 12 Dec 2012 09:55:00 -0500Ann Romney's tears and other revelations from Mitt Romney's post-election lifehttp://theweek.com/article/index/237242/ann-romneys-tears-and-other-revelations-from-mitt-romneys-post-election-lifehttp://theweek.com/article/index/237242/ann-romneys-tears-and-other-revelations-from-mitt-romneys-post-election-life<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0087/43907_article_main/w/240/h/300/the-day-after-thanksgiving-mitt-romney-looked-loving-yet-surprisingly-disheveled-in-a-photo-he.jpg?209" /></P><p class="p1">In the weeks after the presidential election, some observers have seen signs that <strong>Mitt Romney is taking his defeat pretty hard</strong>. For what it's worth, a photo surfaced of him pumping gas, in which his famously sculpted hair flopped loose in un-gelled, disheveled glory. Then there was the Facebook photo of him and his wife, Ann, in which it appeared that the teetotaler had just woken up from a well-deserved bender (or, alternatively, was just tired). There were the comments he made to his wealthiest donors, in which he blamed his defeat on "gifts" that President Obama had showered on minorities and...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/237242/ann-romneys-tears-and-other-revelations-from-mitt-romneys-post-election-life">More</a>By <a href="/author/ryu-spaeth" ><span class="byline">Ryu Spaeth</span></a>Mon, 03 Dec 2012 12:48:00 -0500The embarrassing internal GOP polling that showed Mitt Romney winning the electionhttp://theweek.com/article/index/237161/the-embarrassing-internal-gop-polling-that-showed-mitt-romney-winning-the-electionhttp://theweek.com/article/index/237161/the-embarrassing-internal-gop-polling-that-showed-mitt-romney-winning-the-election<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0087/43851_article_main/w/240/h/300/mitt-romney-gives-a-hastily-prepared-concession-speech-on-election-night.jpg?209" /></P><p class="p1">Mitt Romney famously did not write a concession speech on Election Night. There seemed little point, so supremely confident was he that he'd emerge the victor &mdash; based on late-in-the-game internal polling. Then came the actual results which, by all accounts,<strong> were a complete surprise to his campaign</strong>, even though they matched up with an aggregate of public polls<strong>. </strong>Team Romney had badly miscalculated the electorate's composition, and underestimated President Obama's ability to turn out his supporters. <em>The New Republic</em>'s Noam Scheiber got his hands on some of the campaign's deeply flawed final...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/237161/the-embarrassing-internal-gop-polling-that-showed-mitt-romney-winning-the-election">More</a>By <a href="/author/ryu-spaeth" ><span class="byline">Ryu Spaeth</span></a>Fri, 30 Nov 2012 10:33:00 -0500Why President Obama's annoying campaign emails workedhttp://theweek.com/article/index/237088/why-president-obamas-annoying-campaign-emails-workedhttp://theweek.com/article/index/237088/why-president-obamas-annoying-campaign-emails-worked<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0087/43797_article_main/w/240/h/300/president-obama-devising-the-perfect-one-word-subject-line.jpg?209" /></P><p class="p1">"Hey." So went the subject line of a campaign email blasted to tens of millions of President Obama's supporters, as if the leader of the free world was just checking in to see whether they wanted to grab a couple of drinks after work. Some other gems included the even briefer "Hi," the more suggestive "About Tonight," and &mdash; need anything more be said? &mdash; "Clooney." The emails were a widespread source of mockery, and Jon Stewart captured the frustration of many when he said, "I'd mind it less if your subject line emails were, 'Give me money.'" But it turns out there was a fastidious science...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/237088/why-president-obamas-annoying-campaign-emails-worked">More</a>By <a href="/author/ryu-spaeth" ><span class="byline">Ryu Spaeth</span></a>Thu, 29 Nov 2012 10:00:00 -0500Irony alert: Mitt Romney's final vote tally nears 47 percenthttp://theweek.com/article/index/236741/irony-alert-mitt-romneys-final-vote-tally-nears-47-percenthttp://theweek.com/article/index/236741/irony-alert-mitt-romneys-final-vote-tally-nears-47-percent<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0087/43637_article_main/w/240/h/300/mitt-romneys-final-vote-tally-may-equal-the-very-number-that-arguably-undid-his-campaign-47-percent.jpg?209" /></P><p class="p1">Liberal schadenfreude is about to reach overdose levels. Just when you thought the dead horse of Mitt Romney's campaign had been beaten more than enough &mdash; and most savagely&nbsp;by members of his own party &mdash; Dave Wasserman at <em>Cook Political Report</em> projects that the final count of the popular vote, which is still ongoing, will show <strong>Romney winning 47 percent of the electorate</strong>. In addition to proving that Obama handily won the popular vote, the final tally makes Romney the official candidate of the 47 percent &mdash;&nbsp;a delicious irony, liberals say, given that Romney infamously claimed...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/236741/irony-alert-mitt-romneys-final-vote-tally-nears-47-percent">More</a>By The Week StaffWed, 21 Nov 2012 10:10:00 -0500Why Mitt Romney will regret blaming his loss on Obama's 'gifts' to minoritieshttp://theweek.com/article/index/236469/why-mitt-romney-will-regret-blaming-his-loss-on-obamas-gifts-to-minoritieshttp://theweek.com/article/index/236469/why-mitt-romney-will-regret-blaming-his-loss-on-obamas-gifts-to-minorities<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0086/43487_article_main/w/240/h/300/mitt-romney-is-coming-off-as-a-bit-of-a-sore-loser-by-arguing-that-the-real-reason-president-obama.jpg?209" /></P><p>Mitt Romney is taking fire from both the left and the right after telling donors on Wednesday that he lost last week's election because President Obama had showered young voters, minorities, and other key liberal constituencies with "big gifts." "With regards to the young people, for instance, a forgiveness of college loan interest, was a big gift," Romney said on a conference call with his national finance committee. "Free contraceptives were very big with young college-aged women." He also said that Obama's health care reform was a "huge" gift for Latinos and blacks. Republican Gov. Bobby Jindal...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/236469/why-mitt-romney-will-regret-blaming-his-loss-on-obamas-gifts-to-minorities">More</a>By The Week StaffThu, 15 Nov 2012 11:05:00 -0500Secession threats, aggravated assault, and more overreactions to the election [Updated]http://theweek.com/article/index/236297/secession-threats-aggravated-assault-and-more-overreactions-to-the-election-updatedhttp://theweek.com/article/index/236297/secession-threats-aggravated-assault-and-more-overreactions-to-the-election-updated<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0086/43415_article_main/w/240/h/300/holly-solomon-was-so-enraged-by-the-results-of-the-presidential-race-that-she-allegedly-ran-over.jpg?209" /></P><p>Threatening to move to Canada or France is <em>so</em> 2004. In the wake of the Nov. 6 election, voters disappointed that Mitt Romney lost to President Obama are taking the time-honored tradition of the post-election tantrum into uncharted territory. Some are lashing out at the federal government, while others are taking out their ballot-box blues on targets closer to home. Here, four overreactions to last week's presidential election:<br /><br /><strong>1. Trying to secede from the Union</strong><br />It's no secret that "the 2012 election figuratively divided the country," says Lester Brathwaite at <em>Queerty</em>, but the split is "fixin' to...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/236297/secession-threats-aggravated-assault-and-more-overreactions-to-the-election-updated">More</a>By The Week StaffWed, 14 Nov 2012 09:20:00 -0500How Obama won re-electionhttp://theweek.com/article/index/236147/how-obama-won-re-electionhttp://theweek.com/article/index/236147/how-obama-won-re-election<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0086/43307_article_main/w/240/h/300/after-being-re-elected-for-a-second-term-us-president-barack-obama-delivers-his-victory-speech-in.jpg?209" /></P><p><strong>BARACK OBAMA&nbsp;</strong><span class="s1"><strong>WAS</strong>&nbsp;</span>at his red-brick home on Chicago's South Side when the good news started reaching him early in the night. He was in the fold of his family when New Hampshire became the first swing state to fall his way and when the incomplete but encouraging results from Florida made it seem more likely that the title of president would precede his name for another four years. He was watching television and working the phones at the Fairmont Hotel when Wisconsin went for him, and then Iowa. Soon enough NBC became the first network to declare him the winner, and then other networks and...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/236147/how-obama-won-re-election">More</a>By The Week StaffSat, 10 Nov 2012 15:02:00 -0500President Obama's victory: 6 conservatives behaving like sore losershttp://theweek.com/article/index/236211/president-obamas-victory-6-conservatives-behaving-like-sore-losershttp://theweek.com/article/index/236211/president-obamas-victory-6-conservatives-behaving-like-sore-losers<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0086/43351_article_main/w/240/h/300/after-president-obamas-win-donald-trump-fired-off-a-series-of-angry-tweets-including-this-election.jpg?209" /></P><p class="p1">Conservative America is understandably bummed that President Obama won re-election on Tuesday night. "Losing a presidential campaign just stinks," says Jonathan Chait&nbsp;at <em>New York</em>. "You feel like a stranger at home." And while most Republicans seem to be handling the defeat with relative grace and dignity, a number of conservative commentators and celebrities are engaging in whining, lashing out, wild finger-pointing, and general childishness. Here, six conservatives&nbsp;behaving like sore losers:</p><p class="p1"><strong>1. Karl Rove</strong> <br />Many political reputations were tarnished in the wake of Obama's victory, but perhaps...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/236211/president-obamas-victory-6-conservatives-behaving-like-sore-losers">More</a>By The Week StaffFri, 09 Nov 2012 14:45:00 -0500'Drunk Nate Silver': The best tweets from the funniest post-election memehttp://theweek.com/article/index/236197/drunk-nate-silver-the-best-tweets-from-the-funniest-post-election-memehttp://theweek.com/article/index/236197/drunk-nate-silver-the-best-tweets-from-the-funniest-post-election-meme<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0086/43338_article_main/w/240/h/300/nate-silver-not-drunk-in-2009-the-numbers-gurus-spot-on-predictions-inspired-a-waggish-election.jpg?209" /></P><p>Of all the memes and internet inside jokes spawned by the long-gestating presidential election on Nov. 6, the liveliest one involves <em>New York Times</em> statistical prognosticator Nate Silver &mdash; arguably the campaign's most celebrated and controversial figure not named Barack or Mitt. Silver got a lot of flak from Mitt Romney supporters and more gut-based political commentators, but he correctly predicted how all 50 states would vote, and came within a hair of calling the popular vote. So on Nov. 7, after the eerie accuracy of Silver's data model became clear &mdash; and Silver informed his readers...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/236197/drunk-nate-silver-the-best-tweets-from-the-funniest-post-election-meme">More</a>By The Week StaffFri, 09 Nov 2012 11:55:00 -0500Mitt Romney's disastrous ground game and 7 other behind-the-scenes revelationshttp://theweek.com/article/index/236189/mitt-romneys-disastrous-ground-game-and-7-other-behind-the-scenes-revelationshttp://theweek.com/article/index/236189/mitt-romneys-disastrous-ground-game-and-7-other-behind-the-scenes-revelations<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0086/43335_article_main/w/240/h/300/on-election-night-mitt-romney-remained-stoic-ann-romney-cried-paul-ryan-was-shocked-janna-ryan.jpg?209" /></P><p class="p1">The presidential election is over, but the real story behind the race is only just emerging. After months of enough spin to make a washing machine envious, members of the campaigns are starting to let down their guard and dish some dirt to media outlets. From Mitt Romney's embarrassingly ineffective get-out-the-vote operation to President Obama's peevish attitude toward the debates, post-election autopsies have given political junkies a lot to mull over before they, yes, turn to the 2016 race. Here, eight behind-the-scenes revelations from the campaign:</p><p class="p1"><strong>1. Romney was shellshocked&nbsp;by Obama...</strong></p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/236189/mitt-romneys-disastrous-ground-game-and-7-other-behind-the-scenes-revelations">More</a>By The Week StaffFri, 09 Nov 2012 11:30:00 -0500WATCH: President Obama's tearful thank-you to his volunteershttp://theweek.com/article/index/236182/watch-president-obamas-tearful-thank-you-to-his-volunteershttp://theweek.com/article/index/236182/watch-president-obamas-tearful-thank-you-to-his-volunteers<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0086/43324_article_main/w/240/h/300/president-obama-got-a-little-weepy-as-he-thanked-his-young-campaign-staff-in-chicago-im-really.jpg?209" /></P><p><strong>The video:</strong>&nbsp;President Obama's re-election campaign has released a video showing the president giving an emotional thank-you to the young campaign troops at his headquarters in Chicago on Wednesday morning. Obama told the staffers that they were part of the best campaign team in history, and, wiping tears from his cheek, the president hailed the crowd of 20-somethings as being way ahead of where he was at their age. "You're smarter [than I was], you're better organized, you're more effective. So I'm absolutely confident that all of you are going to do just amazing things in your lives." He continued...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/236182/watch-president-obamas-tearful-thank-you-to-his-volunteers">More</a>By The Week StaffFri, 09 Nov 2012 10:05:00 -0500World reactions to Obama's re-election: A slideshowhttp://theweek.com/article/slide/236109/world-reactions-to-obamas-re-election-a-slideshowhttp://theweek.com/article/slide/236109/world-reactions-to-obamas-re-election-a-slideshow<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0086/43283_slideshow_main/w/240/h/300/world-reactions-to-obamas-re-election-a-slideshow.jpg?209" /></P><p>The U.S. elections weren't just closely watched at home; people all over the world were nervously waiting to see how the candidates would fare. And as news spread that President Obama had secured four more years, his international fans celebrated with flags, paper hats, and even cardboard cutouts of the smiling president, as this group of giddy Indians did in New Delhi. Here are 8 more enthusiastic global reactions.</p><p>&nbsp;</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/slide/236109/world-reactions-to-obamas-re-election-a-slideshow">More</a>By The Week StaffThu, 08 Nov 2012 12:35:00 -0500