The Week: Most Recent Movies:Harry Potterhttp://theweek.com/supertopic/topic/223/harry-potterMost recent posts.en-usFri, 24 Feb 2012 10:27:00 -0500http://theweek.comhttp://theweek.com/images/logo_theweek.pngMost Recent Movies:Harry Potter from THE WEEKFri, 24 Feb 2012 10:27:00 -0500J.K. Rowling's adult novel: A recipe for failure?http://theweek.com/article/index/224794/jk-rowlings-adult-novel-a-recipe-for-failurehttp://theweek.com/article/index/224794/jk-rowlings-adult-novel-a-recipe-for-failure<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0073/36642_article_main/w/240/h/300/jk-rowling-at-least-one-critic-found-her-attempts-to-tackle-more-mature-themes-within-the-harry.jpg?209" /></P><p>The leap from writing children's literature to penning adult fiction is sort of like the jump from acting to singing &mdash; many have tried it, but only a few (Judy Blume, for instance) have succeeded. So nobody is quite sure what to expect from <em>Harry Potter</em> creator J.K. Rowling's upcoming novel for adults, announced Thursday by publisher Little, Brown, and Co. Rowling's only revelation: It "will be very different to the <em>Harry Potter</em> series." Expectations are high &mdash; fan Natalie Summers gushed on Twitter that "Rowling announcing a new book is almost like God announcing a follow-up to the...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/224794/jk-rowlings-adult-novel-a-recipe-for-failure">More</a>By The Week StaffFri, 24 Feb 2012 10:27:00 -0500The 'ridiculous' Harry Potter alternate endinghttp://theweek.com/article/index/217549/the-ridiculous-harry-potter-alternate-endinghttp://theweek.com/article/index/217549/the-ridiculous-harry-potter-alternate-ending<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0063/31920_article_main/w/240/h/300/according-to-british-journalist-greg-palast-jk-rowlings-alternate-ending-to-the-wildly-popular.jpg?209" /></P><p>One perk of being friends with J.K. Rowling? According to British investigative journalist Greg Palast, who claims to have struck up an unlikely friendship with the Harry Potter author, Rowling's pals get exclusive insight into the best-selling author's creative mind. Palast insists that Rowling told him about an alternate ending she considered for the series, one that she ditched in favor of the more cinematic final showdown at Hogwarts. Palast posted the account on his blog, but many Potter fans aren't buying it. How might the series have ended? Here, a brief guide. (Warning: Many spoilers lie...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/217549/the-ridiculous-harry-potter-alternate-ending">More</a>By The Week StaffFri, 22 Jul 2011 12:10:00 -0400Can Harry Potter win an Oscar?http://theweek.com/article/index/217388/can-harry-potter-win-an-oscarhttp://theweek.com/article/index/217388/can-harry-potter-win-an-oscar<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0063/31839_article_main/w/240/h/300/rupert-grint-daniel-radcliffe-and-emma-watson-attend-the-new-york-premiere-of-harry-potter-and-the.jpg?209" /></P><p>Harry Potter may have defeated Voldemort and saved the wizarding world, but there's one accomplishment that's still eludes him: Oscar. Over the course of the first seven Harry Potter films, the franchise racked up nine Academy Award nominations &mdash; all in the technical categories &mdash; and no wins. Could <em>Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2</em> be the film that changes that? Not only is the eight installment of the series shattering box-office records, it has cast a spell over critics, too. Its 97 percent critics' approval rating at Rotten Tomatoes is the highest by far for any film in...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/217388/can-harry-potter-win-an-oscar">More</a>By The Week StaffTue, 19 Jul 2011 11:41:00 -0400Harry Potter's record-breaking last hurrah: By the numbershttp://theweek.com/article/index/217355/harry-potters-record-breaking-last-hurrah-by-the-numbershttp://theweek.com/article/index/217355/harry-potters-record-breaking-last-hurrah-by-the-numbers<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0063/31807_article_main/w/240/h/300/harry-potter-fans-hold-up-signs-at-a-new-york-premiere-of-harry-potter-and-the-deathly-hallows-part.jpg?209" /></P><p>Engorgio! <em>Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2</em>, the eighth installment in the $6.3 billion (and counting) Harry Potter franchise, set a slew of box office records this weekend. In its first three days of release, the young wizard's swan song sold out screenings around the world, putting it on track to be the first Potter film to gross more than $1 billion. Just how financially magical was the <em>Deathly Hallows Part 2</em>'s opening weekend? Here's a concise data breakdown:<br /><br /><strong>$168.6 million</strong><br />Opening weekend domestic gross for <em>Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2</em>, a new box office record<br /><br /><strong>$158.4...</strong></p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/217355/harry-potters-record-breaking-last-hurrah-by-the-numbers">More</a>By The Week StaffMon, 18 Jul 2011 11:40:00 -0400Harry Potter's biggest milestones: A slideshowhttp://theweek.com/article/slide/217341/harry-potters-biggest-milestones-a-slideshowhttp://theweek.com/article/slide/217341/harry-potters-biggest-milestones-a-slideshow<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0063/31794_slideshow_main/w/240/h/300/2011-harry-potter-world-premiere-in-london.jpg?209" /></P><p><em>Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2</em> opened Friday, ending an implausibly successful franchise that boasts a fervent fanbase millions deep and spans books, films, amusement parks, knick-knacks, and&nbsp;e-publishing. A record 6,000 midnight screenings of the film sold out Thursday night, grossing a staggering $43.5 million. As a generation of Potter fans bids adieu to a global phenomenon, here's a look back at some of the franchise's major milestones.</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/slide/217341/harry-potters-biggest-milestones-a-slideshow">More</a>By The Week StaffFri, 15 Jul 2011 17:18:00 -04005 ways Harry Potter changed our liveshttp://theweek.com/article/index/217325/5-ways-harry-potter-changed-our-liveshttp://theweek.com/article/index/217325/5-ways-harry-potter-changed-our-lives<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0063/31783_article_main/w/240/h/300/a-fan-reads-harry-potter-and-the-deathly-hallows-in-ahmedabad-india-in-july-2007-with-the-release.jpg?209" /></P><p>Goodbye, Harry Potter. After 450 million books sold, $6 billion at the box office, and many, many debates about owls, the final piece of the franchise, <em>Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallow, Part 2</em> hits theaters Friday. The phenomenally successful book and movie series has infiltrated people's lives for 14 years now. Here, five ways the boy wizard left a lasting imprint:<br /><br /><strong>1. Harry Potter changed the publishing industry</strong><br />The wizard novels became a gateway to reading for hordes of people, says Charlie Jane Anders at <em>io9</em>. And not just children. The series got adults who "hadn't picked up a book in years...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/217325/5-ways-harry-potter-changed-our-lives">More</a>By The Week StaffFri, 15 Jul 2011 12:59:00 -0400The 'amazing' Harry Potter corn mazehttp://theweek.com/article/index/217171/the-amazing-harry-potter-corn-mazehttp://theweek.com/article/index/217171/the-amazing-harry-potter-corn-maze<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0063/31717_article_main/w/240/h/300/farmer-tom-pearsy-the-man-behind-the-harry-potter-maize-maze-poses-in-costume-in-the-thick-of-his.jpg?209" /></P><p><strong>The photo:</strong> Harry Potter fans are preparing to say their anxious goodbyes to the wizarding series this weekend, as the final Potter movie hits theaters. <em>Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part Two</em>&nbsp;has already racked up&nbsp;$25 million in ticket pre-sales&nbsp;in the U.S. alone. But though Harry has no shortage of crazed admirers, Tom Pearcy, a farmer in York, England, might just be the craziest. Pearcy carved not one, but two football field&ndash;sized portraits of the young wizard into a corn field, creating a maze that doubles as what he calls the largest Potter images ever. (See...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/217171/the-amazing-harry-potter-corn-maze">More</a>By The Week StaffWed, 13 Jul 2011 12:03:00 -0400The final Harry Potter movie: Better than the book?http://theweek.com/article/index/216988/the-final-harry-potter-movie-better-than-the-bookhttp://theweek.com/article/index/216988/the-final-harry-potter-movie-better-than-the-book<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0063/31595_article_main/w/240/h/300/harry-potter-battles-for-the-final-time-in-deathly-hallows-part-ii-and-an-early-screening-has-some.jpg?209" /></P><p><em>Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part II </em>opens in theaters next week, marking the final installment in what's become the most successful movie franchise of all time, with a $6.3 billion haul over the last decade. And just as Potter fans are anxiously awaiting the film's release, a handful of critics lucky enough to catch an advanced screening couldn't wait to post their reactions online. The verdict: <em>Deathly Hallows Part II</em> is "sensational," "thrilling," and "the grandest of grand cinematic endings." Indeed, the last film is receiving the best reviews of any in the eight-movie franchise, but...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/216988/the-final-harry-potter-movie-better-than-the-book">More</a>By The Week StaffThu, 07 Jul 2011 12:02:00 -0400J.K. Rowling's 'mysterious' new website: 7 theorieshttp://theweek.com/article/index/216473/jk-rowlings-mysterious-new-website-7-theorieshttp://theweek.com/article/index/216473/jk-rowlings-mysterious-new-website-7-theories<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0062/31203_article_main/w/240/h/300/a-teaser-for-a-mysterious-new-pottermore-website-is-revving-up-harry-potter-fans.jpg?209" /></P><p>"The owls are gathering... Find out why soon." That's the tease on YouTube from Harry Potter author J.K. Rowling, on a webpage that features a clock ticking down the seconds until Thursday, June 23. With the final movie in the mega-popular Harry Potter series due out next month, Rowling has launched a "mysterious" new website called Pottermore, and is teasing it on YouTube. Rowling's representatives have said the site is not about " a new book" and "not directly related" to the upcoming film. So what's it all about? Here, seven theories:</p><p><strong>1. A Harry Potter encyclopedia</strong><br />This could be "some kind of...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/216473/jk-rowlings-mysterious-new-website-7-theories">More</a>By The Week StaffFri, 17 Jun 2011 17:20:00 -0400The Harry Potter cast's 'unbearably cute' first screen testhttp://theweek.com/article/index/216096/the-harry-potter-casts-unbearably-cute-first-screen-testhttp://theweek.com/article/index/216096/the-harry-potter-casts-unbearably-cute-first-screen-test<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0061/30991_article_main/w/240/h/300/now-somewhat-wizened-wizards-daniel-radcliffe-and-emma-watson-first-tested-out-their-acting-chops.jpg?209" /></P><p><strong>The video:</strong> With <em>Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2</em> gearing up for a big summer release &mdash; and its three stars now old enough to become legally drunk in America &mdash; it's easy to forget how young, precocious, and green Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson, and Rupert Grint were when they started shooting the first movie. Here's a simple reminder: A snippet of the magical trio's first screen test together, filmed more than 10 years ago, has been spliced into a teaser for the franchise's final installment. (Watch the video below.) Even during that initial screen test, Hermione was already...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/216096/the-harry-potter-casts-unbearably-cute-first-screen-test">More</a>By The Week StaffThu, 09 Jun 2011 13:38:00 -0400Why we love Harry Potter: 5 theorieshttp://theweek.com/article/index/209580/why-we-love-harry-potter-5-theorieshttp://theweek.com/article/index/209580/why-we-love-harry-potter-5-theories<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0053/26780_article_main/w/240/h/300/harry-potter-has-rebellious-teens-dark-magic-and-a-good-orphan-story-whats-not-to-like.jpg?209" /></P><p>Even before box office receipts from this weekend's opening of <em>Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Part 1 </em>are counted, the Harry Potter story is already the most profitable international movie franchise and the most successful book series in history, in terms of volumes sold. What has driven a children's tale about a young wizard and his friends to such heights? Here are five theories:</p><p><strong>1. We're suckers for a good orphan story<br /></strong>"We root for Harry Potter for the same reasons we root for Oliver Twist and Shirley Temple," says Steve Daly in <em>Newsweek</em>: They're orphans. Author J.K. Rowling goes one...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/209580/why-we-love-harry-potter-5-theories">More</a>By The Week StaffFri, 19 Nov 2010 14:51:00 -0500Is 'Harry Potter 7' only for hardcore fans?http://theweek.com/article/index/209496/is-harry-potter-7-only-for-hardcore-fanshttp://theweek.com/article/index/209496/is-harry-potter-7-only-for-hardcore-fans<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0053/26725_article_main/w/240/h/300/in-the-running-for-most-incomprehensible-movie-of-the-year.jpg?209" /></P><p>The seventh and penultimate installment of the Harry Potter movie franchise hits theaters this weekend, and mostly positive reviews are flooding in. But nearly all critics agree that newcomers to the series may have trouble following the complex plot of <em>Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1</em>, which is based on the seventh and final Potter book<em></em>. Should the uninitiated bother buying a ticket? (Watch the <em>Harry Potter</em> trailer)</p><p><strong>The movie is only for the most dedicated Muggles: </strong>If you aren't an expert on the Potter series, at least read the book first, says Nigel Andrews at the <em>Financial Times...</em></p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/209496/is-harry-potter-7-only-for-hardcore-fans">More</a>By The Week StaffThu, 18 Nov 2010 14:38:00 -0500The 'Harry Potter' phenomenon: 7 surprising factshttp://theweek.com/article/index/209435/the-harry-potter-phenomenon-7-surprising-factshttp://theweek.com/article/index/209435/the-harry-potter-phenomenon-7-surprising-facts<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0053/26693_article_main/w/240/h/300/daniel-radcliffe-admitted-to-taking-two-pairs-of-harry-potters-glasses-as-a-memento-of-the-wizardly.jpg?209" /></P><p>Friday's box office debut of <em>Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Part 1</em>&nbsp;marks the beginning of the end of J.K. Rowling's beloved fantasy saga. (Watch the movie trailer.) In the real world, however, the Harry Potter phenomenon will inevitably keep generating ripple effects. The series' impact can already be seen in everything from a spike in owl poaching in India to the creation of a earthbound Quidditch league in U.S. colleges. Here are seven other ways that Potter mania has played out in the real world:</p><p><strong>1. Warner Bros. panicked when it almost lost its Hermione<br /></strong>In 2006, when Emma Watson...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/209435/the-harry-potter-phenomenon-7-surprising-facts">More</a>By The Week StaffWed, 17 Nov 2010 14:22:00 -0500India's owl-population crisis: Is Harry Potter to blame?http://theweek.com/article/index/209000/indias-owl-population-crisis-is-harry-potter-to-blamehttp://theweek.com/article/index/209000/indias-owl-population-crisis-is-harry-potter-to-blame<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0052/26391_article_main/w/240/h/300/author-jk-rowling-gave-her-hero-harry-potter-a-snowy-owl-because-she-considers-it-the-most.jpg?209" /></P><p>Hunting and selling owls has been illegal in India since 1972, but a new report from the country's environment ministry says a thriving black market is endangering wild populations of the birds. And Environment Minister Jairam Ramesh says J.K. Rowling's fictional wizard Harry Potter is partly to blame. What's really going on? Here, a brief guide:</p><p><strong>How could this be Harry Potter's fault?</strong><br />The covert owl trade is nothing new in India. Many of the illegally traded animals are used for black magic and ceremonial rituals surrounding Diwali, the annual five-day "Festival of Light," which has just begun...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/209000/indias-owl-population-crisis-is-harry-potter-to-blame">More</a>By The Week StaffFri, 05 Nov 2010 08:30:00 -0400Harry Potter's Quidditch: A real college sport?http://theweek.com/article/index/208612/harry-potters-quidditch-a-real-college-sporthttp://theweek.com/article/index/208612/harry-potters-quidditch-a-real-college-sport<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0052/26120_article_main/w/240/h/300/the-new-york-university-quidditch-team-takes-home-field-advantage-at-the-quidditch-world-cup-this.jpg?209" /></P><p><strong>The video:</strong> Not long ago, Quidditch was a sport exclusive to Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry in J.K. Rowling's <em>Harry Potter</em> books. But a nerdy version for "muggles," or nonmagical people, is now being played at 400 colleges around the world. (Watch a<em> </em>report below.) Instead of flying on broomsticks, players run around the field with brooms tucked between their legs. And instead of chasing a flying, winged "snitch," the collegiate "seekers" chase a human playing the role of the elusive gold ball. Players from 60 schools &mdash; up from 20 last year &mdash; will gather in New York...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/208612/harry-potters-quidditch-a-real-college-sport">More</a>By The Week StaffTue, 26 Oct 2010 14:00:00 -0400The 'Harry Potter' sex scenehttp://theweek.com/article/index/103918/the-harry-potter-sex-scenehttp://theweek.com/article/index/103918/the-harry-potter-sex-scene<img src="https://7e8c.https.cdn.softlayer.net/807E8C/origin.theweek.com/img/dir_0040/20418_article_main/w/240/h/300/harry-potter-all-grown-up.jpg?209" /></P><p>Harry Potter fans are abuzz this week with news that the final film installment, "Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows," will likely include a dream sequence featuring Harry (Daniel Radcliffe) and Hermione (Emma Watson) in a "very sexy" nude scene. The film, slated for release in two parts -- the first opening in late 2010 -- includes "mature" content that director David Yates created exclusively for the big screen, while axing parts of author J.K. Rowling's original manuscript. Is it wrong to sex up a childhood icon like Harry Potter?<br /><br /><strong>Potter is just taking cues from the competition:</strong> Next to the...</p> <a href="http://theweek.com/article/index/103918/the-harry-potter-sex-scene">More</a>By The Week StaffWed, 09 Dec 2009 11:55:00 -0500