Feature

Health scare of the week: BPA linked to miscarriages

Research is connecting BPA to an increased risk of miscarriage.

The chemical bisphenol A (BPA)—commonly found in plastic containers, food can linings, and cash register receipts—has long been suspected of interfering with the body’s hormones. Now research is connecting it to an increased risk of miscarriage, The Telegraph (U.K.) reports. In a study of 114 pregnant women with a history of infertility or miscarriage, those whose blood tests showed the highest levels of BPA during early pregnancy were found to be 80 percent more likely to miscarry than women with lower levels. While the study doesn’t prove a causal link, biochemist Linda Guidice, president of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, says it adds to “the biological plausibility” that BPA may impair fertility. Although BPA has been removed from baby bottles and reusable water bottles in recent years, the FDA still considers it safe for other uses. Stanford University endocrinologist Ruth Lathi suggests that couples looking to conceive “avoid canned food, avoid cooking or heating plastic, and then avoid unnecessary cash register receipts.”

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