Feature

High-end support for the 99 percent

Some of the children of the 1 percent back the Occupy Wall Street movement.

Occupy Wall Street is getting some support from the children of the 1 percent, said Jessica Pressler in New York. A Tumblr page called “We stand with the 99 percent,” the brainchild of a group of wealthy young people working for social change, features photos of trust-fund babies and young scions holding signs expressing solidarity with those less fortunate. “I have more money than I know what to do with,” reads one poster. “Tax me more.” A sign held by two young blond twins reads, “You would know our dad, if we told you who he was.”

Occupy Wall Street has been “embraced by people from all points on the socioeconomic spectrum,” but young 1 percenters say it’s still hard to come forward. “I think it’s a really scary process for them,” says Sophie Hagen, one of the Tumblr page’s founders. “It’s almost like coming out.”

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