Feature

Where to buy...Michael Zelehoski

Zelehoski's works are being shown at Sanford Smith in Great Barrington.

Michael Zelehoski is remaking the ordinary. The young artist takes everyday wooden objects—soda crates, ladders, traffic barriers—and reconstructs each one on a two-dimensional plane. The craftsmanship of each work impresses, as do the weathered textures of the found materials. Some images use traditional perspective to create the illusion of depth; others subtly distort space. Even as the artist begins pushing further toward abstraction, the shock of the work remains how much easier it is to see the beauty in a shipping pallet when it’s been reassembled to hang flat upon a wall. At Sanford Smith, 13 Railroad St., Great Barrington, Mass., (413) 528-6777. Through Oct. 13. Prices range from $3,500 to $12,000.

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