Feature

Health scare of the week: Strollers that stress out babies

A new study has found that babies who spend a lot of time being pushed along in a front-facing stroller become anxious and stressed.

Infants who spend a lot of time being pushed along in a front-facing stroller become anxious and stressed, possibly suffering long-lasting psychological damage, says a new study. Researchers at Dundee University in Scotland studied 3,000 infants, some of whom were pushed by parents in front-facing strollers, and others in rear-facing strollers in which the infant and parent could see each other. In the rear-facing strollers, the study found, parents made eye contact and spoke to babies more often, which reassured them and let them drift off to sleep. Babies in the front-facing strollers, who could not see their parents, had higher heart rates and other detectable signs of stress. “Life in a stroller is emotionally impoverished and possibly stressful,” researcher Suzanne Zeedyk tells the London Daily Telegraph. “Stressed babies grow into anxious adults.”

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