The mouth of the tunnel is wide and dark, swallowing the light and all that breathes. Rubble is scattered along the train tracks, bordered by retaining walls covered in numerous layers of graffiti.

This is where it all started.

Here by the parkway with the blasting trucks and the roaring cars, near the filigree arches of the Riverside Drive viaduct, here with the gravel crunching under my feet as I run down the railroad into this hollow mouth.

This is where they live, deep into the depths of the city, way underground, lying in the dirt. Sure, you know about them. Of course you know about them. They've always been there, resting low below the rowdy streets and the carving avenues, gulping the air from inside the earth, crawling through holes and cracks, living off the grid and off the books.

Here in the tunnels.

You've heard the rumors. Their eyes have adapted to the constant night that cloaks them from the topside world. Don't you know they're eating rats and human flesh? Don't you know they want us dead? And one day they will spill outside and burn us all alive, and they will reign over our flatscreen joys and our organic delights.

Of course you know about them. The lost ones, the hidden ones. The broken and the ill, the wandering, the gone. The Mole People.

"Jon," I call, looking up. Jon has been homeless for more than fifteen years. Like many of the people interviewed for this article, he did not want to give his full name. He has been living here for a while now, in a small space between two support beams that can only be reached with a ladder. A plywood roof protects his hoarded belongings from seeping water. The place is crammed full. There is an old mattress on the floor, and cookware, blankets and electronics stacked on makeshift shelves.

"Jon," I repeat, and he appears, his head cautiously peaking up from his house, a relieved smile on his face when he sees me.

"I thought it was the Amtrak police," he later says while opening a beer, his legs dangling off the edge of the wall. "They been coming less, lately, but you never know. Regular police ain't bothering me, but Amtrak, they can be nasty."

Jon says he did prison time. He is bipolar and suffers from major substance dependence. He used to be a gang member in the Bronx. He used to be a family man until he got disowned. He was a furniture salesman. The FBI is looking for him. He used to know Donald Trump. It doesn't matter which version is true. His real story has been buried long ago under thick layers of improvised memories that grew more detailed by the years, the man slowly becoming a collage of himself.

"I'm good here," he says. "No taxes, no rent, no nothing. There's no hassle compared to the streets, you know what I'm saying? Here I don't get bugged by kids. It's a safe place. I can do what I wanna and I don't have to take nothing from nobody."

(Illustration by Anthony Taille/Courtesy Narratively)

It was a good day for Jon, despite the rain and the cool weather.

"You're the first person to visit this week," he says. "People don't want to speak to me when they come here. I don't know, man. They're scared or something. I can get why, it's a spooky place when you don't know it. But people, they like it when it's scary. They like it when it's dirty, right? It makes them feel alive. That's why they make up these stories about cannibalism and stuff. Like alligators in the sewers."

Jon offers me a sip of vodka. We drink together. He tells me to stay safe and to watch out for trains when I go back walking into the tunnel. I hear him talk to himself as I go away from the entrance and from the white sky.

The smell down here is the one of brake dust and mold. I can see rats scouring for food and drinking from brown puddles in the tracks ballast. EXISTENCE IS FLAWED, a graffiti inscription reads.

The city growls over my head — a distant growl muffled by the concrete, almost a snarl, like something cold and foul spreading over the long stretches of stained walls, like a dark and wild beast curling up around me and breathing on my neck. A dark and wild beast silently trailing me.

Stories about underground dwellers were already flourishing when the first New York City subway line opened in 1904. The expansion of extensive sewers and steam pipes systems had brought a newfound fascination with what laid below the streets. From Jules Verne's 1864 novel "Journey to the Center of the Earth" to George Gissing's 1889 book "The Nether World," literature was brimming with tales of people living in isolation or trapped under the surface, peaking in 1895 with "The Time Machine," in which H. G. Wells described a fictional subterranean species called the "Morlocks."

But it was only in the 1990s that the first widespread depictions of real-world tunnel residents appeared in New York. A 1990 New York Times article by John Tierney was the earliest to outline the phenomenon, looking at people living in an abandoned train tunnel beneath Riverside Park, along the banks of the Hudson River.

Collective imagination took over quickly.

In 1993, Jennifer Toth published her essay "The Mole People," documenting hidden communities residing in a network of forsaken caverns, holes and shafts across Manhattan. An instant hit, it chronicled the organization of those underground societies, describing compounds of several thousands where babies were born and regular lives were lived, with elected officials, hot water and even electricity.

However, the book was promptly criticized for its inconsistencies. Joseph Brennan, a New York rail buff, wrote an extensive and detailed critique in 1996, exposing many discrepancies in Toth's reporting, such as places that couldn't exist, exaggerated numbers and contradictory claims. According to Brennan, the whole notion of secret passages was implausible and "reminiscent of scenes in the TV series ‘Beauty and the Beast.'"

A 2004 article by Cecil Adams further demonstrated that many accounts were perhaps more sensationalism than truth. Adams pointed out unverifiable or incorrect facts in Toth's work, and her skepticism peaked during her interview of Cindy Fletcher, a former tunnel dweller who challenged important points of the narration. "I'm not saying the book is not true, I just never experienced the things [she] said she saw," Fletcher explained to Adams. I was unable to reach Toth for comment, but when Adams talked to her, the journalist said she couldn't remember how to access certain places described in her essay — possibly not to disclose the whereabouts of trespassing squatters.

Still, while the essay might have been inflated or romanticized, it was nonetheless true that the homeless begging in the streets of New York were merely the tip of the iceberg. Photojournalists Margaret Morton and Andrea Star Reese have both extensively documented communities spread in underground hideouts since Toth's book. Dutch anthropologist Teun Voeten's 1996 diary "Tunnel People" provided an incredible account of the months he spent with the Riverside Park Amtrak tunnel inhabitants before they were evicted and moved to Section 8 housing units. In 2000, director Marc Singer released his acclaimed documentary "Dark Days," filming the same people followed by Voeten and Toth in their respective books.

(Illustration by Anthony Taille/Courtesy Narratively)

"There were definitely people living in tunnels, but not a lot," Norman Diederich, a former MTA maintenance inspector, told me. "If there are still any, they're very discreet. This period is gone."

"There were talks that the moles were cannibals," Diederich continued. "That they could see in the dark. That they spoke their own language. Creepy stuff, straight out of a horror movie… Most was made-up. I personally never witnessed unusual stuff. Santa Claus, the Boogeyman, the Mole People, it's all the same. We need to label things we don't understand. It's human nature."

"Just cause you can't see don't mean ain't nothing there," begins Anthony Horton's 2008 graphic novel "Pitch Black," relating the author's own struggles as a homeless man. Written in an abandoned crew room of the F subway line, these words were the reason I ventured into the tunnels in the first place, looking for the invisible, guided by local dwellers along the years to seek foundations of humanity in the foundations of the city.

All the stories I had read about the Mole People before descending myself had two things in common.

They all showed simple human beings who were in no way comparable to the legends that had been told, and they all included a man named Bernard Isaac.

Read the rest of this story at Narratively.

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