David Murphy rang the doorbell of a typical suburban house, set far back from a busy street amid trees and shrubs. An older woman opened the door, accompanied by a short, elderly dog and a tall, scruffy, younger one. "Come in, dear," she said, leading him into a sitting room. Everywhere he looked, piles of clothes and bags of papers lined the walls. She'd used all the wall space and started hanging pictures from the bookshelves. Thick dust coated everything. And then, the smell hit him: dog urine.

Her name was Sandy Edgerly. Her gray hair twisted on each side of her head and met in a bun. Her shirt was buttoned to the neck, and she slid the house slippers from her feet the instant she sat down, pulling her legs up under her. As she explained the job — yard work, projects around the house, and some light housework — David surveyed the chaos surrounding them, considering the disconnect between what she was hiring him to do and what actually needed doing. She wanted someone for about 10 hours a week and she could pay $12 per hour.

David had just moved to Chapel Hill. In Fort Lauderdale, he'd worked at an eyeglass office for two years. He hated it. He hated wearing dress shirts and slacks and ties. He hated selling and managing and sitting in an overly air-conditioned office. So when he moved to North Carolina he wanted a different life.

This was exactly what he was looking for.

In the month between turning 25 and starting my first grown-up job as a middle school teacher, I met David. It was the end of a solitary year that followed four years of back-to-back relationships. When he pulled back from our first kiss on a windy Fort Lauderdale beach, he looked toward the dark sky and said, "I think I'm in trouble."

I'd never experienced the luxury of being certain how much someone liked me. When David looked at me, I could feel interest emanating from him. He touched me as though I was the loveliest woman he'd ever come across. Nine months in I bought him a thrift-store hand-blown glass vase — a vase I liked so much that I couldn't bear to part with it.

"Well," I said, "I wouldn't have to if you moved in."

With him, I learned how to be in an adult relationship. We spent time together and time alone. Our stuff merged well and we had a room of our own in the apartment we shared. When we fought no one yelled. Instead we talked and worked to put us back together. I was happy, secure, safe.

I was also doubtful and afraid. Someone said to me, "We don't go into relationships expecting them to end." But, I did. They always had an expiration date. My parents divorced when I was seven and the only happy long-term couple I knew was supposedly a sham — the man was rumored to be gay.

With David, I went through phases. Unsure, especially in the face of his certainty. Then I'd focus on my desire to be with him for that day alone. The days added up and I forgot about my doubts for a while.

On the second day, Sandy gave David a full tour of her 7,000 square-foot home. She'd dressed to work in a ball cap and noticed that he did, too, in shorts, a t-shirt, and sneakers. With evident embarrassment, she led him deeper into the house, where she never allowed anyone to go. They walked by laundry baskets that had been sitting beside the front door for six years as she talked about how she and her husband liked to collect things with a history. Over 41 years they'd amassed a large collection of books, figurines, art, furniture, dishes, and clothes. Art leaned against walls, lurked under beds, hid in closets. They'd been meaning to do a thorough cleaning when John was diagnosed with liver cancer in April 2006. By September he was gone. Friends washed her clothes and brought them back in those laundry baskets, but she hadn't put the clothes away or even moved the baskets since the funeral.

Sandy and John on their wedding day, November 1965. | (Sandy Edgerly/Courtesy Narratively)

She showed David the garage, so full they couldn't walk into it. The basement and an accompanying apartment were cluttered with not only clothes and papers, but also archaic electronics, obsolete health-care items, and old office supplies. David got to work without awaiting instruction, excavating walkways mid-tour.

Soon they were working 40 hours a week. And they had some disagreements. He pulled up the oriental rugs that old Lucky had coated in urine and took them to the cleaners. He wanted Lucky confined to one room, but Sandy wanted him to roam. They compromised: The bedrooms were off limits and the clean rugs would remain in the basement until Lucky went to his heavenly reward. David sorted everything into categories: Keep and Put Away, Give to Charity, Throw Away.

Each day Sandy started off with David, telling him what pile each object belonged in. But she often got tired and had to go rest in the living room. Then he grew bolder, sorting on his own. She always checked the trash after he'd gone and if she saved anything — a piece of ribbon, a Halloween decoration — she jokingly chided him for getting rid of it the next day.

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