I was standing on an overturned milk crate on Bourbon Street, in face paint and a ball gown. The world was a blur. My body was entirely still — one hand holding out my huge skirt and the other a paper fan, frozen mid-flutter.

A group of frat boys appeared from the milling crowd around me. They wore Mardi Gras striped polo shirts in purple, green, and gold, though it was October. Plastic beads winked on their necks, and they all gripped neon novelty drinks known as Hand Grenades. Though they were just fuzzy swatches in my peripheral vision, I could identify the color-by-numbers attire of tourists in New Orleans.

The group remained a blur because, as usual while working, I gazed only at a softened middle distance, not focusing my eyes. One of the dudes approached, so close I could smell his sugary drunk breath. He clapped his hands a few inches from my face. His palms expelled a little gust of air, cool on my grease-painted nose and cheeks.

I didn't react. I didn't look at him, or speak.

For several years in my 20s, off and on, I was a professional statue. Statue was both a noun and a verb. I was a statue; statuing was what I did. My job was, basically, not to react. Unless one of the tourists gave me what I wanted — a tip in the plastic lemonade pitcher at my feet — I gave them nothing.

When I wasn't statuing, I always gave people what they wanted. I made eye contact. I listened patiently. I was free with my thanks and my apologies. I forgave.

In particular I forgave Toby, my boyfriend of several years, whose name I've changed here to protect his privacy. I forgave him for not getting a job, for the long nights I spent listening to stories of his childhood pain, for throwing our bedroom lamp across the room in a temper. I used my statuing money to pay our rent, to buy our groceries. When we were too broke to go to the laundromat, I washed our clothes by hand in the bathtub and draped them over our chain-link fence to dry. Forgiving him was a daily act, a constant renewal.

And above all, I smiled, for Toby's benefit and everyone's.

Except here, now, on Bourbon Street. It didn't matter that my legs ached, standing on the milk crate. That my arms ached, frozen mid-gesture with the fan. That my neck ached, under my huge, flowered hat. I statued as often as I could handle, though I also worked construction, at 10 bucks an hour, for an uptown slumlord. On a good statuing day, I made three times that, but I could only work three-hour shifts; physically, it was the harder of the two jobs.

I'd trained myself to smile in childhood after multiple grown-ups, seeing me frowning in thought, asked if something was wrong. Once I'd learned to make my face rest in a vague smile by default, the grown-ups stopped asking.

On Bourbon Street I didn't smile, or flinch. Even my blinking was rare and deliberate, and the frat boys weren't having it. They would not, could not, leave me alone. It was as if, by doing nothing, I had challenged them to a fight. My refusal became a battleground.

"Hey, Gorgeous, will you marry me?" tried the one who had clapped in my face a few seconds earlier.

I didn't answer.

"She must be a lesbian!"

"Is it even a woman? Maybe it's a man!"

"Is that a mustache? She needs to shave."

Another one clapped in my face. I kept the fan still, the skirt still. I didn't answer.

When a new blur approached — deferential, kneeling to drop a dollar in the pitcher at my feet, I focused my eyes and came to life.

It was a woman who'd tipped me. Her husband, with fat white legs and a bucket hat, stood diffidently behind her. I felt my humanness returning, collecting. I blinked and the world sharpened; I reinhabited my blank, white-painted face. I looked her in the eyes, mouthed "Thank you," fanned myself, and curtsied. When I smiled at her, it felt like I was bestowing a gift.

"She moved, she moved!" the woman cried, in frank delight. "She looked at me!"

The frat crew hung back; I could see them without seeing them. Now that I'd been suddenly rendered human, they didn't know what to make of me. One shuffled nearer, but was recalled by his friends, and they wandered uncertainly away. But later, one of those polo shirts bobbed into my vision again. A quick stoop to the tip jar, the rosy flash of a larger bill. A $5, a $10? I'd find out later; for now, finally, I looked the kid in the eye.

"Uh, thanks, uh, sorry about that," he said. He was flushed under freckles and looked impossibly young. I gave him a curtsy, and, absolved, he was gone.

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