Quoteables
February 10, 2016

Gov. Chris Christie (R-N.J.) is reportedly suspending his presidential bid as early as Wednesday, after weak showings in both Iowa and New Hampshire. Media mogul Rupert Murdoch was ready with an uncouth analysis of the news:

The victim he references, surely, is Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.), who came in fifth place in Tuesday's New Hampshire primary, just days after Christie steamrolled him for repeating himself in a presidential debate. Julie Kliegman

July 29, 2015

That revelation comes courtesy of a New York Times article pulling from "hundreds of pages of sworn testimony by Mr. Trump over the past decade." The Times wryly notes that the picture of Trump under oath is "something less flattering" than Trump's preferred image as "a teller of difficult truths, whose wealth unburdens him from the careful pronouncements of ordinary candidates."

To wit: "You're disgusting," Trump told a lawyer who asked for a medical break from court proceedings in 2007 in order to pump breast milk for her 3-month-old baby. "Do you even know what you're doing?" he additionally challenged her during questioning.

But beyond that, Trump tipped his hand as to how disconnected he is from 21st century technologies.

Television? "I don’t have a lot of time," he said, "for listening to television."

Text messages? Not for him.

For a candidate who says he is an authority on modern business, Mr. Trump is slow to adopt technology. In 2007, he said he had no home or office computer.

"Does your secretary send emails on your behalf?" he was asked.

His secretary generally typed letters, Mr. Trump said. "I don’t do the email thing."

By 2013, Mr. Trump was still not sold on email. "Very rarely, but I use it," he said under questioning. [The New York Times]

Read the whole thing at The New York Times. Jeva Lange

June 30, 2015

One day after NBC severed ties with 2016 GOP candidate Donald Trump over "derogatory statements" he made about Mexican immigrants, fellow Republican candidate Sen. Ted Cruz has sided with Trump.

"When it comes to Donald Trump, I like Donald Trump. I think he's terrific. I think he's brash. I think he speaks the truth," Cruz said in a Tuesday morning interview on Fox & Friends. Cruz added that NBC is "engaging in political correctness that is silly and that is wrong."

NBC announced Monday it would no longer air the Miss USA and Miss Universe beauty pageants, which Trump owns, and indicated Trump would be bumped from his role as host of The Apprentice.

When asked if Mexican immigrants are "mostly" rapists and drug dealers, as Trump suggested in his speech, Cruz replied: "They're not mostly that. But Donald Trump — he has a way of speaking that gets attention. And I credit him for focusing on an issue that needs to be focused on."

"I don't think you should apologize for speaking out against the problem that is illegal immigration," Cruz said. "Donald Trump is exactly right to highlight the need" to crack down on illegal immigration, he added.

Trump expressed gratitude for having Cruz in his corner, sending a "thank you" tweet on Tuesday morning. Emily Goldberg

May 29, 2015

First the Oscar snub, now this — The Lego Movie can't catch a break. (Well, save that it grossed nearly $500 million, but other than that.)

Sen. Ron Johnson (R-Wis.), a businessman himself, condemned the animated children's movie — in which "Mr. Evil Businessman" plots to destroy the world so he alone may profit — as "insidious" propaganda. "That's done for a reason," Johnson said. Hollywood is cultivating a "cultural attitude" in which people believe "government is good and business is bad."

On Thursday, Johnson responded on his website to a Huffington Post article that reported his comments, saying the writer "can't seem to figure out why I or anyone else would say this about The Lego Movie."

"[T]he point that The Lego Movie was an especially grievous slam on business was made by others," Johnson wrote. "The strange thing isn't that a kids' movie was anti-business, it is that someone claiming to be a journalist never encountered the idea before."  Stephanie Talmadge

April 7, 2015

Gov. Scott Walker (R-Wis.) has said that his first act as president would be to undo the Obama administration's nuclear deal with Iran. Doing so, Obama said in an interview with NPR, would be "a foolish approach to take."

The president said that he's confident whoever is elected president "will be knowledgeable enough about foreign policy and... the traditions and precedents of presidential power that they won't start calling to question the capacity of the executive branch of the United States to enter into agreements with other countries."

"Perhaps Mr. Walker, after he's taken some time to bone up on foreign policy, will feel the same way," Obama said.

Walker has yet to announce that he's officially running for president in 2016, however, he's already polling well in favorability among Republican voters. Teresa Mull

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