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accusations
August 13, 2019

After nine women came forward to accuse opera star Plácido Domingo of sexual harassment, the Los Angeles Opera announced on Tuesday afternoon it will "engage outside counsel" to look into the allegations.

Domingo has been the L.A. Opera's general director since 2003. In an article published Tuesday morning by The Associated Press, the women — eight singers and a dancer — said Domingo sexually harassed them, with some incidents dating back to the late 1980s. They said Domingo pressured them into sexual relationships, and when they rebuffed his advances, he would sometimes punish them professionally. AP interviewed nearly three dozen additional singers, dancers, administrators, and orchestra musicians who said they saw Domingo act inappropriately.

Domingo, 78, told AP the allegations are "deeply troubling and, as presented, inaccurate," and he "believed that all of my interactions and relationships were always welcomed and consensual." Since the article's publication, the Philadelphia Orchestra has rescinded an invitation for Domingo to appear at its opening night concert in September, and the San Francisco Opera has canceled a concert scheduled for Oct. 6, which would have marked the 50th anniversary of Domingo performing with the company. Catherine Garcia

February 13, 2019

Several women are accusing singer-songwriter Ryan Adams of emotional abuse and sexual misconduct, including his ex-wife, actress and singer Mandy Moore, and a woman who says she was underage when Adams exposed himself to her during a video chat.

Several of the more than a dozen people who spoke to The New York Times said Adams would promise career opportunities, but if they rejected his advances, he would become emotionally and verbally abusive. Moore told the Times that "music was a point of control for him," and he would often promise to bring her into the studio but then replace her with another artist. "He would always tell me, 'You're not a real musician, because you don't play an instrument,'" she said.

One woman, now 20, told the Times she started talking with Adams online in 2013. She plays bass, and it wasn't long before their chats about music and a career turned into phone sex. The Times reviewed 3,217 text messages between Adams and the woman, who is identified by her middle name, Ava. The texts show that Adams repeatedly asked Ava about her age, and even though she said at times she was 18 or older, he still said in 2014 that he would "get in trouble if someone knew we talked like this." She also told the Times that she once agreed to video chat with him, and once they were connected, she saw that he was naked.

Adams' lawyer told the Times his client "unequivocally denies that he ever engaged in appropriate online sexual communications with someone he knew was underage." On Twitter Wednesday evening, Adams said he's "not a perfect man," but the "picture that this article paints is upsettingly inaccurate." Catherine Garcia

February 4, 2019

Virginia Lt. Gov. Justin Fairfax (D) released a statement early Monday categorically denying a report published Sunday night accusing him of sexually assaulting a woman at the 2004 Democratic National Convention.

The allegation was publicized by Big League Politics, the same conservative website which last week broke the story that Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam (D) placed a racist photo in his 1984 medical school yearbook page. Should Northam reverse course and resign over the revelation, Fairfax would be his successor.

Fairfax's denial says — and CBS affiliate WUSA9 in Washington, D.C., confirms — multiple outlets including The Washington Post previously investigated the allegation and elected not to run it, concluding there was not enough evidence to go to print.

Per Big League Politics, the woman accusing Fairfax is one Vanessa Tyson, an associate professor of politics at California's Scripps College and fellow at Stanford University. Tyson has yet to comment directly to the press; the initial report is based on a private message she wrote to a friend and reportedly gave permission to be shared. Details of the allegation have not been revealed. Bonnie Kristian

January 2, 2019

Several women who worked on the 2016 presidential campaign of Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) told The New York Times they faced sexual harassment and were not paid the same as their male counterparts.

Samantha Davis, who worked as the director of operations in Texas and New York, told the Times that after she rebuffed her supervisor's invitation to his hotel room, she was marginalized. "There was no one who would or could help," she said. Giulianna Di Lauro, a Latino outreach strategist, said she told a manager that while driving a surrogate around in Nevada, he ran his hand through her hair "in a sexual way" and continued to "push my boundaries" over the course of the day. The manager responded, "I bet you would have liked it if he were younger," then laughed.

The Times spoke with a dozen former staffers and delegates over the last month, and none knew if Sanders was aware of the complaints. Several said it upset them that a progressive candidate's campaign would have problems with sexual harassment and pay disparity, and it makes them wary of supporting Sanders should he run in 2020. Jeff Weaver, Sanders' 2016 campaign manager and a top adviser, told the Times that "anybody who committed harassment on the campaign would not be asked back. ... In 2016, as the size of our campaign exploded, we made efforts to make it a positive experience for people. That there was a failure pains me very much."

Regarding pay, Davis said she earned about $2,400 a month as a senior staff member, and when she discovered that a younger man who was originally supposed to report to her made $5,000 a month, she told the campaign's chief operating officer and her salary was adjusted. "I helped at least a dozen women request raises so that they would be held on par with their male peers," Davis told the Times. Read more about the accusations at The New York Times. Catherine Garcia

October 7, 2018

Unnamed Turkish officials have told multiple news outlets they believe Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, who has been critical of the regime in Riyadh, was killed inside the Saudi consulate in Istanbul.

"The initial assessment of the Turkish police is that Mr. Khashoggi has been killed at the consulate of Saudi Arabia in Istanbul," one official told NBC News on Saturday. "We believe that the murder was premeditated and the body was subsequently moved out of the consulate."

The claim has not been independently confirmed. Saudi Arabian state media "strongly denounced these baseless allegations," and Saudi officials said Khashoggi left the consulate of his own volition and went to an unknown location.

"When I speak of the fear, intimidation, arrests, and public shaming of intellectuals and religious leaders who dare to speak their minds, and then I tell you that I'm from Saudi Arabia, are you surprised?" Khashoggi wrote in a 2017 column for The Washington Post. "I can speak when so many cannot. I want you to know that Saudi Arabia has not always been as it is now. We Saudis deserve better." Bonnie Kristian

July 29, 2018

The CBS board of directors will convene on Monday to discuss allegations of sexual harassment against CEO Les Moonves.

The board plans on creating a special committee to look into the accusations and the overall culture at the network, two people familiar with the matter told CNN. In an article published in The New Yorker on Friday, six women told Ronan Farrow that Moonves sexually harassed them, and CNN reports the board meeting was scheduled before the article came out. Moonves, who has been head of the network for more than a decade, told The New Yorker he's "promoted a culture of respect and opportunity for all employees."

Moonves did acknowledge that "there were times decades ago when I may have made some women uncomfortable by making advances," which he regrets "immensely," but he says he never used his position "to harm or hinder anyone's career." Catherine Garcia

February 27, 2018

After The Wall Street Journal published decades of sexual misconduct allegations against casino magnate Steve Wynn in January, police in Las Vegas were approached by a woman who accused Wynn of raping her in the 1970s, The Associated Press reports.

On Tuesday, AP obtained copies of police reports recently filed by two women, including one who said that Wynn raped her inside her Chicago apartment at least three times in 1973 and 1974. She also told police that she became pregnant and gave birth to a daughter inside a gas station bathroom.

The second woman said that in 1976, while working at the Golden Nugget casino-hotel in Las Vegas, she had consensual sex with Wynn "several times," but "felt coerced to perform the acts." When she became involved in a romantic relationship with someone else, the woman said, she rebuffed Wynn's advances and was then accused of stealing $40 and forced to resign.

Because the statute of limitations in Nevada is 20 years, the Las Vegas case will not be investigated, AP says. Wynn denied all of the allegations reported by the Journal, claiming they are part of a smear campaign against him. Earlier this month, the billionaire resigned as chairman and CEO of Wynn Resorts, and in January he stepped down as finance chair of the Republican National Committee. Catherine Garcia

February 4, 2018

President Trump followed up his initial claim that the Nunes memo "totally vindicates 'Trump'" in the Russia probe with additional tweets Saturday evening accusing the FBI and the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (also called the FISA court) of being used to manipulate the 2016 election. Quoting a Wall Street Journal editorial, Trump aimed his worst ire at the FBI:

The editorial's argument rests on the memo's revelation that the FBI acquired FISA permission to spy on Trump campaign aide Carter Page based significantly on the Steele dossier, whose creation was partially funded by a Clinton campaign lawyer, without telling the court the source of the information. Thus, the Journal says, the "FBI in essence let itself and the FISA court be used to promote a major theme of the Clinton campaign."

However, the Journal rejected Trump's claim that the memo proves his campaign innocent of Russia-related allegations under investigation by Special Counsel Robert Mueller. "We doubt Mr. Mueller will be deterred by any of this," the editorial says. "The question of FISA abuse is independent of Mr. Mueller’s work, and one that Congress takes up amid a larger debate about surveillance and national security." Bonnie Kristian

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