×
california wildfires
November 18, 2018

On Sunday, firefighters continued to make progress against the Camp Fire in Northern California, the deadliest fire in state history, and the Woolsey Fire in Southern California.

The Camp Fire in Butte County has killed at least 76 people, scorched 149,500 acres, and destroyed 12,786 structures, the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection said Sunday. There are 993 people unaccounted for in the area. The fire is 60 percent contained.

The Woolsey Fire has burned 96,949 acres in Los Angeles and Ventura counties, destroying 1,130 structures and killing at least three people. The fire is 90 percent contained, with Cal Fire expecting full containment by Thursday.

About four inches of rain is forecast for Butte County late Tuesday through Friday, and close to two inches in Southern California later in the week, which will help both firefighters and air quality but increases the risk of mudslides in burn areas. Catherine Garcia

November 18, 2018

Rain is forecast for areas affected by California's deadly Camp Fire in the coming week, with mixed effects anticipated.

The water may help contain the wildfire, which has claimed 76 lives and burned more than 100,000 acres. However, areas already burned lack live plant cover on uneven ground. "It'll bring much-needed relief to the firefighters and to the air quality," Patrick Burke of the National Weather Service told Reuters, "but there's a potential for dangerous mudslides wherever vegetation is burned away on slopes and hills."

More than 1,000 people are listed as missing in connection to the fire, but authorities say that list may contain duplicate names. Some of those listed as missing have called the police to say they are not in any danger, and the total missing count is expected to shrink as further information becomes available. Bonnie Kristian

November 15, 2018

On Thursday, search teams in Northern California discovered seven more bodies in the Camp Fire burn area, bringing the blaze's death toll to 63.

Authorities say there are now 631 people missing, up from 130 on Wednesday evening. The fire, the deadliest in state history, has burned 141,000 acres, destroyed 11,862 structures, and is about 40 percent contained. Most of the deaths occurred in the town of Paradise, which was almost entirely wiped out by the fire. Officials said it could take several weeks to finish searching for victims. Catherine Garcia

November 12, 2018

At least 42 people have been killed by the Camp Fire in Northern California's Butte County, making it the deadliest fire in state history.

The previous deadliest blaze was the 1933 Griffith Park Fire, which killed 29 people in Los Angeles. The Camp Fire has burned 117,000 acres, destroyed more than 7,100 homes and businesses, and is just 30 percent contained, the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection said on Monday. Most of the deaths were in the town of Paradise, which was almost entirely wiped out by the fire.

In Southern California, the Woolsey Fire has burned 91,572 acres in Los Angeles and Ventura counties, destroying 370 structures and killing two people. It is only 20 percent contained. Two new fires broke out nearby on Monday, but firefighters were able to quickly get them under control, thanks to ground and air support. Winds are fanning the flames in both Northern and Southern California, and forecasters say it is not expected to rain before Thanksgiving. Catherine Garcia

November 11, 2018

California's Camp, Woolsey, and Hill wildfires continued to grow over the weekend, expanding to 105,000 acres, 70,000 acres, and 4,500 acres, respectively.

At least 23 people have been killed by the Camp Fire in northern California, where high winds are expected to return Sunday after a brief lull Saturday. An additional three dozen remain missing in the Camp Fire area.

Another two people were killed in the Woolsey Fire, which along with the smaller Hill Fire has prompted mass evacuations from Malibu and other areas in Los Angeles and Ventura counties. More than 300,000 people are displaced by the three fires combined, and none of the blazes is more than 25 percent contained as of Sunday morning.

President Trump, meanwhile, has continued to argue on Twitter that the fires are the result of improper forest management by California — "Get Smart!" — drawing the ire of the California Professional Firefighters union. "The president's message attacking California and threatening to withhold aid to the victims of the cataclysmic fires is Ill-informed, ill-timed, and demeaning to those who are suffering as well as the men and women on the front lines," said a statement from the union's president. Bonnie Kristian

November 10, 2018

Celebrities including Lady Gaga, Kim Kardashian West, and Rainn Wilson were required to evacuate their homes in Malibu, Calabasas, and Thousand Oaks, Calfornia, on Friday as the Woolsey Fire threatened their neighborhoods.

"I heard the flames have hit our property at our home in Hidden Hills but now are more contained and have stopped at the moment," West tweeted. "It doesn't seems like it is getting worse right now."

The wildfire has already done significant damage to Western Town, an Old West-themed set on the Paramount Ranch.

Western Town has been used in productions including Westworld, Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman, The Love Bug, and more. Bonnie Kristian

November 10, 2018

Federal disaster relief payments to California may be cut off, President Trump tweeted from France early Saturday, unless the state improves its forest management techniques:

California is currently suffering three major wildfires, one of which, the Camp Fire, has grown to become the most destructive recorded in state history. The blaze destroyed the entire town of Paradise, north of Sacramento — some 6,700 structures — and has killed at least nine people. About three dozen more remain missing.

"The magnitude of the destruction in Paradise and a year ago in Santa Rosa is such that it will take many years to recover," said state Sen. Jim Nielsen (R), whose district includes Paradise. "The sadness is that a lot of people who lost their homes will not be able to afford to return once the improvements are completed because the cost of new housing just keeps getting higher and higher." Bonnie Kristian

November 8, 2018

The Camp fire swept through Paradise, California, on Thursday, with officials saying at least 1,000 structures were destroyed.

Scott McLean, a spokesman for Cal Fire, said the fire in Northern California's Butte County has "destroyed the town." Paradise is popular with retirees, and has a population of about 27,000. The fire was first reported around 6:30 a.m., and over just a few hours, the fire grew from 10 acres to more than 10,000. McLean said that by the middle of the day, there was so much smoke in the air, it looked like it was nighttime.

Residents trying to escape clogged the roads, and some people jumped out of their cars when they saw homes and buildings on fire. Resident Kim Benn told the Los Angeles Times she didn't realize how close the fire was until she heard thumps on the roof, and saw that pieces of burning wood were hitting her house. She grabbed her cats and fled, and said once she got on the road and saw flames on both sides, she was convinced she was going to die and called her mother to say goodbye. Catherine Garcia

See More Speed Reads