excuses excuses
July 9, 2020

The Supreme Court will reveal Thursday morning whether Congress, New York state prosecutors, and ultimately the American public will be able to see what's in the tax documents President Trump has worked so hard to keep secret. But on Wednesday night, the White House finally addressed another, lower-profile accounting of Trump's finances, his annual financial disclosure report, that was supposed to be handed in more than a week ago. The filing, required under federal ethics rules, is the only official document publicly detailing Trump's personal finances.

A White House official told The New York Times that Trump had requested an extension because the report was "complicated" and Trump has "been focused on addressing the coronavirus crisis and other matters." This is Trump's second coronavirus extension: The partial disclosure of his assets, debts, and family business performance was actually due in May, but all White House employees had been given a 45-day extension, until June 29, because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Vice President Mike Pence filed his disclosure report by that deadline.

Trump's delay follows conversations between ethics officials and his representatives over a draft of the disclosure report, people briefed on the matter tell the Times. The Office of Government Ethics and Trump Organization declined requests for comment on the filing. Peter Weber

September 27, 2016

Hillary Clinton wasn't particularly impressed with Donald Trump's debate performance Monday night, and she suggested Tuesday that Trump's complaints about his microphone indicate he wasn't either. Earlier Tuesday, Trump wondered whether his debate microphone was purposely tampered with, because he said his volume seemed lower than Clinton's and his microphone seemed to be capturing a sound some thought sounded like the sniffles. "Anyone who complains about the microphone is not having a good night," Clinton said, in response to a question about their microphones during a brief presser aboard her plane.

Clinton thought Trump's biggest stumbles of the night were his "charges and claims that were demonstrably untrue" and the opinions he offered that "a lot of people would find offensive and off-putting." "I'm excited about where we are in this country," Clinton said. "He talks down America every chance he gets. He calls us names. He calls us a third-world country."

Clinton and Trump will face off again Sunday, Oct. 9, in a presidential debate hosted by Washington University in St. Louis and moderated by ABC's Martha Raddatz and CNN's Anderson Cooper. Becca Stanek

See More Speed Reads