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January 18, 2020

The fourth annual Women's March is scheduled to take place on Saturday, and activists are expecting thousands of demonstrators to turn out for the events, which will be held in cities around the country.

The first Women's March took place the day after President Trump's inauguration, and drew hundreds of thousands of participants, reports NPR. This year, the march is expected to be smaller and without the celebrity appearances of years past, in part due to criticism the march's organizers have faced in recent years regarding inclusion and diversity.

The demonstration in Washington, D.C., is expected to attract up to 10,000 demonstrators. Read more at NPR. Summer Meza

July 13, 2017

Having only just returned stateside from a trip to Poland and Germany, President Trump is already back off to Europe, this time enticed overseas by the promise of a military parade in Paris, The Washington Post reports.

"President Trump was not expected to attend France's Bastille Day, which this year will commemorate the 100th anniversary of the United States' entry into World War I," the Post writes. After all, Trump and French President Emmanuel Macron are not exactly fast friends — the two leaders have clashed on a number of issues including the Paris climate deal. In the end, though, the U.S. president was reportedly won over by the ensured sight of "1,200 people, 211 vehicles, 341 horseback riders, and 63 aircraft."

French President Emmanuel Macron told Trump in a June 27 phone call about the event, which this year will feature U.S. and French troops marching through the historic streets near the Arc de Triomphe, fighter jets cutting through the skies above, and flags, horses, and military equipment on display — the sort of spectacle that Trump wanted to stage at his own inauguration in January.

Trump told Macron he would be there, according to a White House official, and French and U.S. officials rushed to schedule a last-minute trip that will last about 27 hours and include dinner at an opulent restaurant in the Eiffel Tower and a visit to Napoleon Bonaparte's tomb. [The Washington Post]

Not everyone is pleased with Trump's decision to show up, though. "The holiday of July 14th is that of the freedom of the French," said far-left leader Jean-Luc Melenchon, who lost to Macron in France's recent presidential election. "Mr. Trump represents NATO and the enslavement of our nation to an international coalition in which it plays no role." Jeva Lange

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