geography lesson
August 11, 2020

It's time for a geography lesson with President Trump.

During an interview with Fox Sports on Tuesday, the president was asked about the situation in Hong Kong, where in recent months China has cracked down with a new national security law that threatens the city's autonomy, and where Hong Kong authorities arrested media tycoon Jimmy Lai earlier this week. Trump didn't exactly echo his national security adviser, Robert O'Brien, who previously said the U.S. is "deeply troubled" by Lai's arrest. He instead complained Hong Kong had made "a lot of money" the U.S. could have made because of "tremendous incentives."

But he did briefly wade into the political situation, simply to say that it's "a little bit tough from certain standpoints" because, when looking at a map, Hong Kong is "attached to" mainland China. And, well, there's no arguing with that. Tim O'Donnell

April 29, 2016

The modern global economy is structured more around mega-cities than national borders, says Parag Khanna, author of a new book called Connectographyand the good news for the United States is that we have a lot of them. While other countries often rely on a single city to drive their economy (like Lagos for Nigeria, Istanbul for Turkey, or Moscow for Russia) America has a lot of big, productive metro areas.

That's the basis for Khanna's design of a re-mapped America organized around city-states instead of the 50 states we have today.


(Washington Post)

Khanna argues that such a reorganization (which includes a high-speed rail scheme to facilitate inter-regional mobility) would be an economic boon, and it would cut back on unfair pork barrel spending that benefits one district at the expense of others. "And if you do that," he concludes, "the laws of economics will take over, and people will more freely engage in commerce." Bonnie Kristian

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