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February 26, 2018

President Trump's senior policy adviser Stephen Miller caught some Z's on Monday during a White House meeting with the nation's governors about the school shooting crisis in America. Captured on camera by the European Pressphoto Agency's Jim Lo Scalzo, photos of the incident show Miller doing little to hide his humongous yawn as well as, apparently, actually being asleep.

The captions for the pictures are particularly damning: "Miller nods off during Trump speech about gun violence at high schools with nation's governors," one reads. "The discussion comes after the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, that left 17 people dead." Jeva Lange

July 21, 2017

President Trump is undoubtedly a man who likes his bullet points, but Axios reports that six months into his term, the U.S. commander-in-chief still can't pay attention through a national security briefing. "Can you believe this guy?" Trump has reportedly joked as his national security adviser, H.R. McMaster, was talking.

McMaster is normally "crisp, linear, [and] dry," Axios adds, but has recently "started to adjust by making shorter points and [speaking in] a more colloquial tone" — that is, he's getting better at communicating in Trumpese. But even still, "Trump likes to be discursive and will frequently turn to others or meander into other subjects while McMaster is briefing him," Axios reports.

That might not be encouraging news to the 76 percent of Americans who think the United States is going to enter a "major war" in the next four years. Read more about how administration officials are learning to communicate with Trump at Axios. Jeva Lange

June 22, 2016

We reported on June 1 that Donald Trump apparently has no idea what the Brexit is and today, on the eve of Britain's referendum vote, we bring you an update: Donald Trump still has basically no idea what the Brexit is.

When asked Wednesday how he feels about the possibility of the United Kingdom leaving the EU, Trump said it was his "inclination" that they should get out. But "I don't think anybody should listen to me [because] I haven't really focused on it very much," the potential next leader of the free world said.

On Thursday, Britain will decide whether to remain or leave the EU, a decision that has threatened to divide Europe. The implications are radical for the United States: Following World War II, the EU brought stability and order to Europe, and as a single unit it has helped the U.S. with geopolitical responsibilities around the world. On the economic front alone, President Obama has urged against a Brexit, saying it could take as many as 10 years for Britain to negotiate new trade deals with the States. Jeva Lange

June 1, 2016

At the end of the month, there will be a referendum to decide if Britain should leave or remain in the European Union. The implications are radical for the United States: Following World War II, the EU brought stability and order to Europe, and as a single unit it has helped the U.S. with geopolitical responsibilities around the world. On the economic front alone, President Obama has urged against a Brexit, saying it could take as many as 10 years for Britain to negotiate new trade deals with the U.S.

"Brexit is not the source of Europe's trend of disintegration," Vox explains, "But if it happens, it could be the beginning of the end for the most successful U.S. foreign policy ever and a serious blow to U.S. efforts to maintain stability and order in Europe and therefore beyond."

In other words, it is a really big deal.

Enter Donald Trump:

"If there's any pattern to [Trump's] conversation, it's that he's vague on all subjects outside himself, his campaign, and the media. Everything else is mere distraction," Michael Wolff writes in The Hollywood Reporter. Perhaps Trump is so vague because he's just been called on and apparently hasn't done his homework. Read the entire profile of Trump in The Hollywood Reporter. Jeva Lange

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