police brutality protests
May 31, 2020

One of the most striking scenes from Saturday's nationwide police brutality protests occurred when New York Police Department vehicles were seen driving into a crowd of protesters, some of whom were holding onto a barricade in front of one the trucks.

It is unclear if there were any injuries. New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio weighed in on the incident, saying that he wished the officers "hadn't done that," but they "were being surrounded by a violent crowd" and "if those protesters had just gotten out of the way," the "troubling" moment never would have happened.

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) was not pleased with the mayor's response, deeming it "unacceptable," especially since the police department ultimately falls under his leadership (although the police union hasn't always taken too kindly to the mayor, either). DeBlasio, she added, needed to "de-escalate" the situation. Tim O'Donnell

May 30, 2020

Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz (D) announced Saturday he is authorizing full mobilization of the state's National Guard for the first time since World War II. The action comes on the heels of protests against police brutality in Minneapolis and the surrounding area.

The Guard said 2,500 soldiers and airmen will be deployed by noon Saturday and they'll work in tandem with local law enforcement.

The protests began after a white Minneapolis police officer kneeled on the neck of a black man, George Floyd, while arresting him despite Floyd saying he couldn't breathe. Floyd later died. The officer, Derek Chauvin, was arrested and charged with third-degree murder and manslaughter Friday, but the demonstrations are expected to continue.

The protests began peacefully, but tensions increased over the course of the week, and several properties were damaged, which is why Walz felt it was necessary to bring in the Guard. The governor also said there are unconfirmed reports that white supremacist groups and drug cartels have taken advantage of the situation and may have incited violence. In fact, he estimates that 80 percent of the people arrested Friday were from out of state, suggesting that those behind the destruction were separate from the catalysts of the initial protests, though some observers note local officials often blame outsiders for civil unrest. Tim O'Donnell

May 30, 2020

As protests against police brutality and institutional racism flared up across the United States on Friday, many turned contentious. Protesters in major cities set fire to police cars and damaged buildings while several incidents in which police officers appeared to escalate violence were captured on social media.

In Brooklyn, the passenger door of a police car driving by protesters was flung open, hitting one of the demonstrators, and another officer was filmed throwing a female protester to the ground. She ultimately wound up in the hospital.

But it wasn't just protesters who were targeted by some members of the police. Hours after a CNN news crew was arrested while covering protests in Minneapolis, a Louisville police officer fired pepper balls at a local television news crew reporting on demonstrations in the Kentucky city, much to everyone's confusion.

Elsewhere, a 19-year-old man was shot and killed in Detroit by an unknown suspect. It's unclear if the victim was a protester, but the shooting occurred where Detroit's demonstration was taking place.

As violence escalates, governors like Georgia's Brian Kemp (R) and Minnesota's Tim Walz (D) have called in the National Guard, and the Pentagon reportedly has military police on standby. Tim O'Donnell

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