wrong lesson learned
November 16, 2019

You've probably seen the Myles Garrett helmet swing by now.

The Cleveland Browns defensive end was suspended indefinitely by the NFL after he ripped off the helmet of Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Mason Rudolph and then proceeded to hit Rudolph over the head with it at the end of the teams' contest Thursday night. Garrett was ejected from the game, and the league came down with the hammer Friday. Fans won't see Garrett until next season, at the earliest.

Football is a violent sport, but Garrett's misconduct was shocking. It was also surprising because of the culprit himself. Garrett, a former No. 1 overall draft pick and Defensive Player of the Year candidate, writes poetry, likes dinosaurs, and is considered an all around nice guy. Of course, that doesn't mean he's beyond losing his composure like he did Thursday. But his over-the-top reaction may have also been a result of his determination to shed his reputation and establish himself as someone not to be trifled with.

Garrett's former defensive line coach for the Browns, Clyde Simmons, told The Ringer in 2018 that Garrett was learning how to be more intimidating on the field:

"There's an unspoken code in football in what you will allow someone to do to you. If somebody's out there cheapshotting and playing dirty, you are the only person that's going to stop that ... At some point you have to stand up and say, 'I'm not taking that crap. I'll be here all day.'" Simmons told me then that most of the time, a few choice words will establish this. "If not there are other things you can do, but I won't be getting into that." [The Ringer]

That isn't to say Garrett's actions were okayed by the Browns or he long ago determined he would attack someone with their own helmet, but it does show he was encouraged to intensify his demeanor. Read more at The Ringer. Tim O'Donnell

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