What I learned from hanging out with lemurs

Giving a pregnant lemur a sonogram is a months-long ordeal. And you'll need Craisins and applesauce.

Duke Lemur Center
(Image credit: (Facebook.com/DukeLemurCenter))

Ardrey the aye-aye was showing signs of pregnancy. That means nest-building, the presence of a sperm plug, or simply not womping on any nearby males. Aye-ayes are lemurs, after all, and lemurs tend to be female dominant — which means male lemurs spend a lot of the day trying not to get the crap kicked out of them.

Because Ardrey is one of just 50 aye-ayes in the entire world living in captivity, her handlers at the Duke Lemur Center were anxious to give her a prenatal exam. Aye-ayes are considered endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature, and sustaining a captive population could one day be crucial to the species' survival.

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