Feature

Recipe of the week: Seafood: Local delicacies from Seattle’s Spring Hill restaurant

The Pacific Northwest has become one of the most exciting foodie destinations in America.

In recent years, the Pacific Northwest has become one of the most exciting foodie destinations in America. An increasing number of top-notch chefs in the Seattle-to-Portland corridor are supporting local farmers and emphasizing regional cuisines.

Spring Hill in West Seattle is among the restaurants “at the top of that list,” said Andrew Knowlton in Bon Appétit. Owner-chefs Marjorie and Mark Fuller use the area’s abundant seafood to create such dishes as this black cod, with a rich ­chowder that also serves as a sauce. In “a modern take on the classic Italian bread salad,” they use panko in the panzanella.

Recipe of the weekBlack Cod With Fennel Chowder and Smoked Oyster Panzanella

Chowder3 tbsp butter¾ cup ¼-inch cubes fresh fennel bulb¾ cup ¼- to 1⁄3-inch cubes peeled Yukon Gold potato½ cup chopped onion¼ cup finely chopped leek (white and pale green parts only)1 tbsp all purpose flour2 small bay leaves1½ tsp chopped fresh thymeOne 8-oz bottle clam juice¾ cup whipping cream¾ cup whole milk1 tsp finely grated lemon peel

Melt butter in large saucepan over medium-low heat. Add fennel, potato, onion, leek. Cover, cook until vegetables are just tender but not brown, about 8 minutes. Add flour, bay leaves, thyme; stir 1 minute. Stir in clam juice, cream, milk. Simmer until chowder thickens slightly and flavors blend, about 10 ­minutes. Mix in lemon peel; season to taste with salt and pepper. Cool 30 ­minutes; cover and refrigerate.

Panzanella and fish¼ cup finely chopped celery¼ cup finely chopped shallot2 tbsp chopped fresh parsley4½ tsp fresh lemon juice, divided½ tsp finely grated lemon peel¼ cup minced smoked canned oysters5 tbsp unsalted butter, divided1 tbsp chopped fresh thyme4 black cod fillets with skinCoarse kosher salt¼ cup panko (Japanese bread crumbs), toasted

Toss celery, shallot, parsley, 1½ tsp lemon juice, lemon peel, smoked oysters in medium bowl. Season celery-shallot mixture to taste with salt and pepper. Combine 3 tbsp butter, thyme, 3 tsp lemon juice in small saucepan. Whisk over low heat until butter melts and sauce simmers; season with coarse salt and pepper. Remove from heat. Melt 2 tbsp butter in large nonstick skillet over high heat. Sprinkle fish with coarse salt and pepper. Add fish, skin side down, to skillet. Cook until skin is crisp and fish opaque in center, drizzling lemon-butter sauce over, 6 to 7 minutes. Rewarm chowder over low heat; discard bay leaves. Divide chowder among 4 shallow bowls. Place fish, skin side down, in center of chowder. Stir panko into celery-shallot mixture; spoon over fish and serve. Serves 4

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