Feature

The future of food delivery

Are you ready for a robot car to drop milk off at your house?

Each week, we spotlight a cool innovation recommended by some of the industry's top tech writers. This week's pick is a futuristic way to get your groceries.

The era of driverless delivery robots is near, said Andrew Hawkins at The Verge​. Supermarket chain Kroger and U.S. tech firm Nuro recently launched their first live test of autonomous grocery delivery cars in Scottsdale, Arizona. To start with, only one location will take part in the pilot program: a Kroger-owned Fry's Food Store. Nearby customers can place orders online or via Fry's mobile app.

At first, groceries will be delivered by self-driving Toyota Prius and Nissan Leaf cars, with a human "safety driver" along for the ride. But in the fall, Nuro will swap in its Nuro R1 vehicle, so customers can expect to see a tiny driverless auto "that looks like a toaster on wheels" roll up to their house. The high-tech service might not appeal to lazy shoppers: Unlike "typical, human-powered" delivery services, the Nuro R1 will make customers "walk to the curb to retrieve their groceries."

Recommended

The daily business briefing: September 22, 2021
JetBlue plane
Business briefing

The daily business briefing: September 22, 2021

Progressives' obvious way out
President Biden and AOC.
Picture of W. James Antle IIIW. James Antle III

Progressives' obvious way out

Facebook reportedly responding to bad press by promoting Facebook on Facebook
Mark Zuckerberg
No News is Good News

Facebook reportedly responding to bad press by promoting Facebook on Facebook

Huge hack of web services provider Epik could be 'Rosetta Stone to the far-right'
Anti-fascist protesters
'embarrassment of riches'

Huge hack of web services provider Epik could be 'Rosetta Stone to the far-right'

Most Popular

Did Theranos Lose Afghanistan?
Elizabeth Holmes and James Mattis.
Samuel Goldman

Did Theranos Lose Afghanistan?

7 cartoons about America's vaccine fights
Editorial Cartoon.
Feature

7 cartoons about America's vaccine fights

Former FDA commissioner questions whether researchers should continue to publish sequences of novel viruses
Scott Gottlieb.
sunday shows

Former FDA commissioner questions whether researchers should continue to publish sequences of novel viruses