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tricky dick looks back
August 8, 2014
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Forty years ago today, Richard Nixon became the first president to resign from the nation's highest position. Speaking into television cameras on August 8, 1974, Nixon explained his belief that following the Watergate spying scandal, he would be unable to effectively corral support and lead the nation.

More than 15 years later, surrounding the release of his memoir RN: The Memoirs of Richard Nixon, a 77-year-old Nixon gave Time a candidly reflective interview in which he addressed the scandal, his legacy, and more. We've included some excerpts from that interview below.

On how history will remember him:

"The jury has already come in, and there's nothing that's going to change it. There's no appeal. Historians will judge it harshly.... I mean, every time I make a speech, or every time I write a book, inevitably the reviewers refer to the 'disgraced former president.' ... There's nothing trivial about Watergate."

On why he decided to write his memoir:

"I really wrote this book for those who have suffered losses or defeats and so forth, and who think that life is over. I felt that if I could share with them my own experiences, it might help. The problem with that, of course, is that resigning the presidency is something that is beyond their imagination."

On whether the Cold War was really over:

"The Soviets have lost the Cold War, but the West has not won it. It is not enough to say now that people have rejected communism, that we're home free. Waging a revolution is difficult, but not nearly as difficult as governing.... I'm not enthused about this idea of sending our political experts over and telling these poor people how to win an election."

Nixon also addressed the then-burgeoning power of Japan and China, his thoughts on Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush, and his assessment of the Vietnam War. Read Time's full transcript here. Kimberly Alters

RIP
10:36 p.m. ET
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Burt Shavitz, the co-founder of Burt's Bees whose face appeared on the company's packaging, has died. He was 80.

"We remember him as a bearded, free-spirited Maine man, a beekeeper, a wisecracker, a lover of golden retrievers and his land," the company said on its Facebook page. "Above all, he taught us to never lose sight of our relationship with nature." Shavitz co-founded Burt's Bees in 1984 with Roxanne Quimby, an art school graduate he met while hitchhiking. Quimby used his beeswax to make candles that she sold at fairs, and during their first year in business, the company earned $20,000, NBC News reports. Their most famous product, lip balm, was introduced in 1991.

The cause of Shavitz's death has not been announced. Catherine Garcia

This is terrible
10:20 p.m. ET
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A boating accident late Saturday night on the Ohio River in Louisville, Kentucky, has left two dead and three missing.

Donald Swinney, 52, and Mark Swinney Jr., 14, both died from drowning, officials said. The incident occurred as thousands gathered around the river for 4th of July festivities, The Courier-Journal reports. The pontoon boat hit a barge and capsized, authorities said, and four people, including three children wearing life jackets, were quickly rescued.

Because of river conditions, rescue teams have been unable to deploy divers to help in the search. The current is "extremely swift, and there's a lot of debris," Louisville Fire Chief Greg Frederick said. "It's challenging, even for our rescue boats, especially when you get close to the dam. You have to be extremely careful." The search will resume Monday. Catherine Garcia

accidents
9:34 p.m. ET
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At least 24 members of a family were injured in North Carolina Saturday when the deck they were standing on collapsed.

The group — with members ranging in age from 5 to 94 — gathered on the 24-by-12-foot deck of their beach house rental to take a family photo, authorities said. Five people are still hospitalized, two in critical condition. In a statement, Emerald Isle town manager Frank A. Rush Jr. said preliminary findings suggest the collapse was due to deteriorated nails on the 29-year-old house. "Although Emerald Isle is a busy and popular tourism destination, it prides itself on its 'family beach image' and 'small-town atmosphere,' and an incident of this nature affects our entire community deeply," he said.

The deck fell at least 10 feet, Emerald Isle Fire Chief Bill Walker told the Los Angeles Times. "It was basically a one-story house that was built on pilings," he said. Rush said no complaints have been filed over the condition of the home, and state law says it is the responsibility of a rental property owner or manager to routinely inspect their properties. Catherine Garcia

This just in
9:04 p.m. ET
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The United States defeated Japan Sunday in the Women's World Cup final game, 5-2, giving the team its first World Cup win since 1999. Within the first 16 minutes of the game, Carli Lloyd scored three goals. Lauren Holiday also scored in the 14th minute and Tobin Heath in the 55th minute. In the 2011 Women's World Cup final, the U.S. lost to Japan on penalty kicks. Catherine Garcia

Don't try this at home
8:50 p.m. ET
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A 22-year-old man in Maine was killed Saturday night after setting off a firework on top of his head, authorities said.

Devon Staples of Calais was drinking with friends on the 4th of July when the incident took place, Stephen McCausland, spokesman for the Maine Department of Public Safety, said. Staples died instantly. The firework was designed to launch the explosive out of a small tube into the air, The Boston Globe reports. This was the first fireworks-related death to take place in Maine since they became legal in 2012, McCausland said. Catherine Garcia

Greek debt crisis
4:26 p.m. ET
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Former Greek Prime Minister Antonis Samaras announced he was stepping down from his role as the head of the nation's conservative opposition party, New Democracy, on Sunday, Reuters reports. His statement came after it became increasingly clear the public voted against Greece taking the eurozone bailout deal, a decision likely to keep the economy in turmoil. With the majority of votes in, the Greek Interior Ministry shows about 61 percent voting "no" in the referendum.

"Our party needs a new start. As of today, I'm resigning from the leadership of New Democracy," he said in a televised statement. Julie Kliegman

Greece votes
4:06 p.m. ET
Javier Soriano/AFP/Getty Images

About 60 percent of Greeks voted "no" on the eurozone bailout referendum Sunday, the Interior Ministry projected. That could lead to the nation being forced out of the eurozone, and a future of prolonged economic uncertainty. If finalized, the vote would support Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras' plea to turn down a deal from eurozone creditors.

The deal from the International Monetary Fund, European Union, and the European Central Bank would have come in exchange for tax increases and economic reform in Greece. The nation missed its Tuesday deadline to make a $1.8 billion loan payment to the IMF. Read more at The New York Times. Julie Kliegman

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