April 30, 2014

In Turkey, texting the letter "K" can apparently land you in prison. Önder Aytaç, a columnist who writes for a Turkish opposition newspaper, was sentenced to 10 months in prison Monday for "insulting public officials" because his tweet about Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan contained that letter tacked onto the end of another word.

Posted in September 2012, the tweet was a response to Erdogan's plan to shutter private schools. In the message, "k" was added to the end of the Turkish word "ustam," meaning either "my chief" or "my master." It sounds innocuous enough, but the addition changed the message to mean "screw off." Business Insider has a screenshot of the tweet here.

Aytaç said it was a simple typo, but the country is known for its strict defamation and censorship laws when it comes to talking ill about public leaders. Erdogan is also skittish about the whole Twitter thing, too, and tried unsuccessfully to ban the social network earlier this month. Jordan Valinsky

3:47 p.m. ET

CNN President Jeff Zucker isn't quite sure Fox News is an accurate name for his competitor's cable channel.

"The idea that it's a news channel, I think, is really not the case at all," Zucker said at an industry conference Thursday, per The Hollywood Reporter.

Those were reportedly some of Zucker's tamer words, as he went on to label Fox News a "complete propaganda machine" that does an "incredible disservice to this country." He even drew comparisons to Russia, calling Fox News "state-run TV."

Tucker didn't limit his comments to President Trump's network of choice; he spoke on the president too. Trump, Zucker said, "doesn't even understand the danger he's causing to journalists" by sowing "anti-media sentiment" — though late last year, he credited Trump with making "journalism great again."

But that's what makes today the "heyday of cable news," Zucker said — and everyone from CNN to Fox News is benefiting from it. Kathryn Krawczyk

3:29 p.m. ET

President Trump offered his younger self some advice while speaking at a millennial-focused panel Thursday.

Asked for wisdom he'd pass on to his 25-year-old self, Trump offered a quip: "Don't run for president," he smirked.

Later in the discussion, Trump lamented how much negative press he received once he announced his bid for the White House. Prior to his involvement in politics, he "got the greatest publicity," he said. Despite all the critical coverage, Trump claimed, people "get it," because they now know about "fake news."

"There is a lot of fake news out there, and nobody had any idea," he continued. "I'm actually proud of the fact that I exposed it to a large extent. We exposed it. It's an achievement."

Trump was interviewed by the leader of Turning Point USA, a network of conservative college students. The president also discussed the opioid crisis, the need for more vocational schools, and young conservatives who are too afraid to vocally support his administration. Watch the clip below, via Bloomberg. Summer Meza

2:39 p.m. ET

Instagram's universally despised algorithm has been so widely criticized that the company announced Thursday that it is going to make significant changes to appease users. In a statement, Instagram said it will at last "ensure that newer posts are more likely to appear first in feed," which will hopefully mean you will no longer miss, well, everything. As Gizmodo puts it: "Instagram apparently no longer wants you to see Christmas Day photos on New Year’s Eve."

While that might seem like common sense, Instagram first started experimenting with a non-chronological feed in the spring of 2016. By 2018, the app was apparently rewarding posts with higher engagement, users who interacted with followers, and making tweaks based on how long other users spent viewing your post or engaging in the content, Later reports.

Other changes are coming too, like a "new posts" button "that lets you choose when you want to refresh, rather than it happening automatically." Finally! Jeva Lange

2:29 p.m. ET

President Trump says he would still talk to Special Counsel Robert Mueller even without his lead lawyer, The Associated Press reported Thursday.

Another day of legal chaos started Thursday morning as John Dowd, Trump's lead lawyer in Mueller's Russia probe, resigned. A little more than an hour later, Trump was asked if he'd still be willing to testify in Mueller's investigation.

"Yes. I would like to," he replied.

It's pretty much the opposite of what Dowd called for Saturday: an end to the investigation into connections between Trump's campaign and Russia, The New York Times reported. Dowd is said to have resigned because Trump wasn't listening to his advice; Dowd reportedly did not want the president to sit for an interview with Mueller's team, while Trump apparently feels he should. Kathryn Krawczyk

1:33 p.m. ET
Win McNamee/Getty Images

The House passed the $1.3 trillion spending bill Thursday, approving the massive package to fund the federal government through September.

The 2,232-page bill was released late Wednesday after congressional negotiators finalized its terms. The proposal increases spending on the military and border protection and provides $1.6 billion for President Trump's proposed border wall — a fraction of the $25 billion the president sought. It does not address the DACA immigration program or defunding sanctuary cities, two hotly-contested provisions, though it does include provisions to increase school safety.

Lawmakers on both sides of the aisle applauded victories achieved in the omnibus bill while some criticized the ways it fell short. Rep. Jim Jordan (R-Ohio) called it "the worst bill I have seen." The Senate will vote on the bill next, as lawmakers move quickly to meet a Friday night deadline to prevent a government shutdown.

Read more at The New York Times. Summer Meza

1:13 p.m. ET

Republican Sen. Bob Corker (Tenn.) questioned if the GOP "has lost its soul" during grave comments Thursday ahead of a vote on the $1.3 trillion budget bill. "For the Republican Party to have the presidency, and for the Republican Party to have the Senate, the Republican Party to have the House of Representatives, and for us to be passing a bill today — obviously it couldn't happen without us, we control the agenda here — for us to be in a situation where we're getting ready to pass a bill that adds $2 trillion in deficits over the next 10 years … does have to be a wakeup call to people as to whether that's the case," he said.

Corker added: "[If] we had a Democratic president and [Republicans] controlled the House and Senate, I can't imagine us being in a situation where we would vote tonight or tomorrow for a bill that's going to add $2 trillion in debt without offsets. Matter of fact, I can just tell you, that would not be the case." Watch his sobering speech on the Senate floor below. Jeva Lange

1:00 p.m. ET

The Dow Jones Industrial Average plunged more than 500 points by noon Thursday ahead of President Trump's announcement of new China-specific tariffs. Trump said the tariffs "could be about $60 billion" and come in response to complaints that Chinese companies "force U.S. companies operating in the country to transfer technology and intellectual property rights to local business partners," CNBC writes.

Supporters of the tariffs, like White House adviser Peter Navarro, argue they combat China's "forced transfer of intellectual property." China has responded by threatening Trump-friendly Farm Belt states with retaliatory tariffs that would target American soybean, sorghum, and live hog exports.

"This is the first of many," Trump vowed as he signed the memorandum. Watch some of the president's comments below. Jeva Lange

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