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March 22, 2016
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Brussels was rocked Tuesday by a series of terrorist bombings at transportation hubs that killed at least 34 people. But, following the Paris terror attacks last November, security experts had warned that Europe would be particularly vulnerable to additional assaults from the Islamic State and other terrorist groups, as the civil war in Syria rages and the subsequent refugee crisis continues to bring waves of undocumented people across borders and into Europe.

But "few countries have been more vulnerable than Belgium," The New York Times reports. Indeed, the small country wedged among Germany, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, and France has been increasingly used by terrorist groups for recruiting and support networks. And, compared to its neighbors, Belgium has produced a disproportionate number of jihadists who go on to fight for ISIS.

"At this point, Belgium is, per capita, by far the European nation contributing the most to the foreign element in the Syrian War," said Belgian Arabist and author Pieter van Ostaeyen. Such extremists are able to live in and be protected by Brussel's insular Muslim community in Molenbeek, one of 19 municipalities in the capital.

In fact, Molenbeek has been linked to radicals behind several terrorist attacks, including the 2004 Madrid train bombings, the Jewish Museum attack in Brussels in May 2014, and the Paris attacks in November 2015. The last surviving suspected Paris attacker, Salah Abdeslam, was captured on March 18 in a Molenbeek hideout after a four-month manhunt.

One of the major soft spots for Belgium is its fractured security. Brussels, which is a relatively small city of 1.2 million, has six different police departments. By comparison, New York City, home to 8 million people, has one united police department. That Molenbeek is seemingly immune to counterterrorism efforts is both a "social and political failure," experts have said. Lauren Hansen

3:54 p.m. ET

Three-year-old giant panda Bao Bao took off from Washington, D.C., on Tuesday for a 16-hour flight to Chengdu, China. Bao Bao was born at the National Zoo on Aug. 23, 2013, and is moving to China as part of a cooperative breeding program. Her older brother, Tai Shan, was the first panda to make the journey in 2010. "Today marks another milestone in our fight to save endangered species," said National Zoo director Dennis Kelly. "Our team has worked so hard for so many years to make sure giant pandas stay on the earth."

Bao Bao is traveling on the FedEx Panda Express, a customized Boeing 777F with her picture emblazoned on the side. The 205-pound panda will be seated in an 800-pound crate, and she is being accompanied on her journey by two zoo staffers — as well as plenty of bamboo, sweet potatoes, and apples to snack on.

"Pandas are very good at entertaining themselves," said Brandie Smith, associate director of animal care at the National Zoo. "You give a panda a stock of bamboo and they can entertain themselves for a very long time." Becca Stanek

3:10 p.m. ET

On Tuesday, Milo Yiannopoulos announced his resignation from Breitbart News, where he was a senior editor. Yiannopoulos' departure follows the release of two video clips in which he made comments seemingly condoning pedophilia. In one of the clips he joked about his childhood sexual encounter with a Catholic priest, and in the other he seemed to "speak sympathetically of certain relationships between adult men and 13-year-old boys," CNN reported.

Earlier Tuesday, Breitbart editor-in-chief Alex Marlow deemed the remarks "indefensible" and "troubling," though he said "the left" has done worse. "I would be wrong to allow my poor choice of words to detract from my colleagues' important reporting, so today I am resigning from Breitbart effective immediately," Yiannopoulos said in a statement. "This decision is mine alone."

On Monday, Yiannopoulos lost a $250,000 book deal with Simon & Schuster and was disinvited from speaking at the upcoming Conservative Political Action Conference due to his comments.

Yiannopoulos wrote on Facebook after the video clips were released that he does "not support pedophilia," which he called a "vile and disgusting crime." "I am a gay man, and a child abuse victim," he wrote. "My own experiences as a victim led me to believe I could say anything I wanted to on this subject, no matter how outrageous."

Read Yiannopoulos' statement of resignation in full below. Becca Stanek

1:23 p.m. ET
Theo Wargo/Getty Images for Tribeca Film Festival

Actor Tom Hanks will make his debut as an author on Oct. 24. Publishing company Alfred A. Knopf first announced the book in 2014 — shortly after Hanks published a story in The New Yorker — but it wasn't until Tuesday that the short-story collection's title was revealed.

Uncommon Type: Some Stories will revolve around typewriters, and each of its 17 stories will involve the increasingly obsolete machines that Hanks collects. The Hollywood Reporter noted the book ranges from stories "about an immigrant just arriving in New York City after leaving his civil war-torn country to a man who bowls a perfect game to an eccentric billionaire."

Hanks has been working on the collection since 2015, and he said in a statement he's taken his work with him as he's "made movies movies in New York, Berlin, Budapest, and Atlanta." "I wrote in hotels during press tours. I wrote on vacation. I wrote on planes, at home, and in the office," Hanks said. "When I could actually make a schedule, and keep to it, I wrote in the mornings from nine to one."

Alfred A. Knopf's editor-in-chief Sonny Mehta praised the book as an "accomplished debut." "I am thrilled by the narrative range on display in this collection, and by the humor and humanity Tom brings to his work," Mehta said. Becca Stanek

1:09 p.m. ET
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Tennessee lawmakers have proposed making it legal for drivers to run over protesters who block public streets. The Republican-sponsored legislation would protect motorists from civil liability if a protester were injured, provided the driver exercised "due care," The Huffington Post reports. The bill was introduced 10 days after a car ran into people at a Nashville protest against President Trump's travel ban. Similar driving laws have been proposed in at least four other states with Republican-led statehouses, including Indiana, Iowa, Minnesota, and North Dakota. The Week Staff

12:46 p.m. ET

On Tuesday, President Trump outright denounced anti-Semitism while speaking at the National Museum of African American History and Culture. After dodging questions from reporters at two separate press conferences last week regarding rising anti-Semitism — only offering that he is "the least anti-Semitic person you have ever seen" — Trump was less equivocating Tuesday, saying "the anti-Semitic threats targeting our Jewish community and community centers are horrible, and are painful, and a very sad reminder of the work that still must be done to root out hate and prejudice and evil."

But the Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect, the U.S. branch of the worldwide organizations founded in Frank's name to fight prejudice and hatred, was not impressed by the president's statement, deeming it a "pathetic asterisk of condescension" after his administration's track record:

On Monday, a Jewish community center in Wisconsin was evacuated after receiving its second bomb threat in three weeks. The Wisconsin center was reportedly one of at least 10 Jewish facilities that received similar threats Monday. Kimberly Alters

12:25 p.m. ET
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On Tuesday, the Department of Homeland Security released documents briefing its agencies on the Trump administration's expanded guidelines for tackling undocumented immigration and deportation. The documents, which Time described as "essentially instruction manuals for the sweeping executive orders issued by President Trump in late January," eliminate Obama-era guidelines that prioritized recent border crossers, undocumented immigrants convicted of serious crimes, or those who may have posed a serious threat to national security. Trump will call for the deportation of any immigrant that is "convicted, charged, or suspected of a crime, which could include traffic infractions," The Associated Press reported.

A DHS fact sheet was succinct: "All of those present in violation of the immigration laws may be subject to immigration arrest, detention, and, if found removable by final order, removal from the United States." Becca Stanek

12:19 p.m. ET
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Jessica Sharman fell in love with the same man twice. When the 20-year-old Briton woke up in the hospital last March after an epileptic attack, her memory was wiped clean. She didn’t recognize her parents, or her doting boyfriend, Rich Bishop. She tried to end their relationship, but Rich vowed to win back her heart. He took her on walks in familiar parks and revisited their favorite restaurants. Eventually, Rich won her over — again. "I don't remember the first time I fell in love with Rich," says Sharman. "But I do remember the second." Christina Colizza

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