America's nosediving law-school applications: By the numbers

The number of students trying to get into law school is declining sharply as tuition and student debt rise while job openings dwindle

Applications submitted to law schools in January decreased by 20 percent compared to a year before.
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Applications to U.S. law schools have plummeted to a 30-year low. With tuition rising and jobs increasingly scarce, more and more students are apparently concluding that the time and money it takes to get a law degree just won't pay off. "We are going through a revolution in law with a time bomb on our admissions books," Indiana University law professor William D. Henderson tells The New York Times. "Thirty years ago if you were looking to get on the escalator to upward mobility, you went to business or law school. Today, the law school escalator is broken." Here, a look at the dimming allure of the nation's law schools, by the numbers:

30,000

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