Feature

Viewpoint: Rich Karlgaard

From The Wall Street Journal: “Businesses located in places where success is the norm, and innovation is built into the ecology...

“Businesses located in places where success is the norm, and innovation is built into the ecology, have a better chance of fixing themselves. Intel almost bit the dust in the mid-1980s, but came back to greater glory. Like Kodak, it faced ruinous Japanese competition. Intel didn’t hesitate. It shed its memory-chip business and bet the ranch on microprocessors. That was a big bet and it was ruthless. Memory-chip factories were shuttered and people were laid off. That was, and is, easier to do in Silicon Valley, where the laid-off can more readily find new jobs, than in a small city like Rochester, whose population is now at 210,000 plus.”
   
Rich Karlgaard in The Wall Street Journal

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