Feature

Jury faults a baseball bat, and more

A jury has ordered a baseball-bat company to pay $951,000 to a high school pitcher who was hit in the face by a line drive.

Jury faults a baseball batA jury has ordered a baseball-bat company to pay $951,000 to a high school pitcher who was hit in the face by a line drive. Lawyers for pitcher Dillon Yeaman argued that the hitter’s aluminum bat had a “design defect”—namely, that the ball came off it too quickly—and should have had a label warning of the “known risk of grave harm” to anyone hit by a fast-moving baseball.

High school ball grinds to a haltAn upstate New York high school has canceled its winter ball to stop students “grinding” on the dance floor. Skaneateles High School officials tried banning lascivious dancing, teaching traditional dance steps, and giving students more room to dance, but the grinding continued. “We determined we couldn’t hold another school-wide dance,” said the principal.

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