Feature

Also of interest...new work from old literary favorites

The Cat’s Table by Michael Ondaatje; Nightwoods by Charles Frazier; Lost Memory of Skin by Russell Banks; We Others by Steven Millhauser

The Cat’s Table
by Michael Ondaatje
(Knopf, $26)
Michael Ondaatje’s latest “is, in the most etymological way, a wonderful novel,” said Philip Hensher in the London Telegraph. Set on a cruise ship in the 1950s, it unfolds its wonders by exploring every stateroom and hold from the wide-eyed perspective of Michael, a Ceylonese boy making the long first trip to his new school in Britain. Michael bonds with two other boys, and at night, the trio prowl the decks in search of adventure. “The enchantments wash over the reader in waves.”

Nightwoods
by Charles Frazier
(Random House, $26)
“Sorry, haters,” but the author of Cold Mountain is not the overhyped pretender you hoped he might be, said Ron Charles in The Washington Post. Charles Frazier may have been wildly overpaid for the disappointing 2006 follow-up to his award-winning, best-selling debut. But this third novel, set in 1960s Appalachia, “is a fantastic book.” A “cleverly knitted thriller” about a reclusive young woman forced to shield a pair of strange twins from a violent pursuer, it’s wry at times and “superbly paced.”

Lost Memory of Skin
by Russell Banks
(Ecco, $26)
The “unlikely protagonist” of Russell Banks’s new novel is a young ex-soldier who lives under a Florida causeway because he and his shantytown neighbors are convicted sex offenders, said Linda Elisabeth Beattie in the Louisville Courier-Journal. We get to know “the Kid” through his relationship with a sociologist whose intervention greatly complicates the young man’s life. Throughout, Banks writes “with empathy, clarity, and humor about how we diminish ourselves by isolating the disenfranchised.”

We Others
by Steven Millhauser
(Knopf, $27)
This collection of new and selected older stories from Steven Millhauser showcases the Pulitzer Prize winner’s diverse gifts, said Dale Singer in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. “In stories ranging from historical to modern, magical to realistic, serious to satiric, his masterful prose style slowly but inevitably weaves narratives that work their way into your consciousness and remain long after you’ve turned the last page.” The only thing a reader could wish for is more stories that weren’t available elsewhere before.

Recommended

Paris won't hold big-screen World Cup broadcasts
Stadium in Qatar
Wrong goal

Paris won't hold big-screen World Cup broadcasts

Nord Stream pipelines may have leaked a record-breaking amount of methane
Nord Stream Pipeline Week
Peaked Leaks

Nord Stream pipelines may have leaked a record-breaking amount of methane

The Chinese Communist Party congress that could make Xi president for life, explained
Xi Jinping.
Briefing

The Chinese Communist Party congress that could make Xi president for life, explained

Has Liz Truss already failed?
Liz Truss.
Briefing

Has Liz Truss already failed?

Most Popular

5 toons about Trump's spiraling legal woes
Political Cartoon.
Feature

5 toons about Trump's spiraling legal woes

Ukraine takes full control of Lyman while Russian media points fingers
Ukrainian flag in Donetsk
do svidaniya

Ukraine takes full control of Lyman while Russian media points fingers

Will Smith returns to the Oscar race after Chris Rock slap
Will Smith
where there's a will

Will Smith returns to the Oscar race after Chris Rock slap