Feature

Tip of the week: How to fight food spoilage

Catch the culprits; Keep salmonella at bay; Refresh stale bread; Don’t get freezer-burned

Catch the culprits. Apples, bananas, cantaloupes, pears, and peaches all emit ethylene, a chemical that can speed up the spoiling process of adjacent produce. Keep these fruits separate.

Keep salmonella at bay. Avoid putting raw meat, poultry, and seafood on the top shelf of the refrigerator. “Their juices, which contain bacteria, can drip down and contaminate other food.”

Refresh stale bread. A little bit of heat is all you need. Spray your stale loaf of bread or too-crusty rolls with water and rebake at 325 degrees. Loaves should bake for 20 minutes and rolls for about five.

Don’t get freezer-burned. Remove meats from their original packages and dip them in cold water before freezing. The water gives the food an “even protective layer” that acts as a shield.

Source: Family Circle

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