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Joe Stack and the Austin plane crash: What we know

A run-down of key facts about the plane crash in Austin, Texas, and the aircraft's pilot, Joseph A. Stack

A small plane crashed into a federal government office complex in Austin, Texas, this morning, causing a massive fire and extensive damage to the building. While the story is still unfolding, a number of important details have already emerged about the pilot and his apparent motivations for the allegedly intentional crash:

UPDATE: CLICK HERE to see THE WEEK'S new, comprehensive guide to Joseph Stack: Inside his personal life, his politics, and his vengeful death wish

The building complex houses IRS, CIA and FBI offices
The structure, called the Echelon building, is located in the 9400 block of Research Boulevard in Austin, Texas, and houses offices for the Internal Revenue Service, including its civil enforcement and criminal investigation divisions, reports the Austin Statesmen. Offices for the CIA and FBI are also housed in the building complex, but were not hit in the crash.

There are no reported deaths, except the pilot
At the site, there is one person still unaccounted for; 13 people were injured during the incident, with two people sustaining critical injuries.

The pilot is Joseph Andrew Stack, of Austin
The plane was a a single-engine, fixed-wing Piper PA-28-236 Dakota. It was reportedly piloted by — and owned by — Austin resident Joseph Andrew Stack. According to CNN, Stack burned down his house before crashing the plane into the Echelon building.

The crash seems to have been intentional
Business Insider has discovered an "anti-big brother rant" on the website EmbeddedArt.com, which is owned by a "Joe Stack," and is "almost certainly from the pilot." To read the full manifesto, click here.

The incident has not yet been labled "terrorism"

Authorities are refraining from using the word "terrorism." But the Federal Aviation Administration says the crash was "apparently a criminal act." Department of Homeland Security spokesman Matt Chandler told CNN that, "At this time we have no reason to believe there is a nexus to criminal or terrorist activity."

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