Feature

Will Google Profiles kill Facebook?

Where Google is taking social networking

A dream has just come true for self-Googlers, said Farhad Manjoo in Slate. With the recent launch of Google Profiles, the search giant has given people the ability to present their “best side to potential employers, prospective dates, future in-laws,” or parole boards. But Google’s push to have users everywhere create their own profiles might also mean that it “aims to take on Facebook.”

The important thing for Google users, said Dan Schwabel in Mashable, is that they now have a powerful new tool to help them build their personal brand online. In this economy, that's crucial. So make it easy for recruiters to find you by claiming your profile—and use your full name so you'll get a vanity profile—and doing the same on other social networks so you can create a hub with all the information you want people to see about you.

But we've already surrendered too much privacy to the Internet, said Geoff Williams in Wallet Pop. I guess "that sooner or later, if this gets popular and everybody's doing it, I'll give in and write up my own Google profile, just as I eventually drank the Twitter water and fell for Facebook." That doesn't mean I'm happy about where Google is taking us.

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