Why they had to ban ‘the wave.’

The week's news at a glance.

Australia

Andrew Dyson

The Age

Cricket fans are the most obnoxious of all sports fans, said Andrew Dyson in the Melbourne Age. At most sporting events, excited crowds can execute an orderly “Mexican wave,” in which the fans stand up briefly in a mass action that ripples around the arena. Cricket fans, though, can’t manage this simple feat. They have to hurl bottles or shoes or whatever they’ve brought with them when they stand up, so desperate are they for physical movement after being “bored rigid” by the “soul-destroying” tedium of the game. That’s why Cricket Australia has banned the wave. Pro-wave activist Matthew Newton, who keeps getting ejected from games for instigating waves, is fighting a losing battle. His heart is in the right place: The lad attends games shirtless, with “Save the Mexican Wave” written on his chest and “Don’t Throw Things” written on his back. But he can’t single-handedly reform thousands of drunken fans. Instead, we should adopt “the royal wave—a restricted circular motion of the right hand.” It “does not obstruct the view of those behind.” Even better, “it is ill-suited for the propulsion of rubbish.”

Subscribe to The Week

Escape your echo chamber. Get the facts behind the news, plus analysis from multiple perspectives.

SUBSCRIBE & SAVE
https://cdn.mos.cms.futurecdn.net/flexiimages/jacafc5zvs1692883516.jpg

Sign up for The Week's Free Newsletters

From our morning news briefing to a weekly Good News Newsletter, get the best of The Week delivered directly to your inbox.

From our morning news briefing to a weekly Good News Newsletter, get the best of The Week delivered directly to your inbox.

Sign up
To continue reading this article...
Continue reading this article and get limited website access each month.
Get unlimited website access, exclusive newsletters plus much more.
Cancel or pause at any time.
Already a subscriber to The Week?
Not sure which email you used for your subscription? Contact us