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Gulf War effects linger

The week's news at a glance.

Washington, D.C.

Thousands of Gulf War veterans suffered neurological damage from exposure to toxic chemicals in Iraq, a federal panel of medical experts has concluded. The findings contradict earlier studies blaming wartime stress for the headaches and brain impairments that plague many veterans of the 1991 war. The report said that 100,000 former soldiers might have been exposed to sarin gas when an Iraqi weapons depot was blown up. Others might be suffering side effects from an anti-nerve-gas drug. Veteran Jim Reichert, 41, said he was relieved that experts had confirmed what he long suspected. “We’re not crazy,” Reichert said. “If I’m a little nuts, it’s because I’ve been sick so long.”

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