Why feminspiration advertising is just the sort of cynical ploy feminism needs

Corporate messaging has real power, even when they don't walk the walk

Always "Like a Girl" campaign
(Image credit: (Photo courtesy Business Wire))

If you've found the unyielding march of feminist-inspired advertising a bad omen for women's rights, you're not alone — but you might be off base.

Over the past few years more and more advertisements have relied on feminist messages to peddle goods to customers. Dove led the way a decade ago with with their wildly successful "Campaign for Real Beauty," and now brand after brand are taking a page from their already-well-worn playbook. Recent examples include T-Mobile and Nationwide featuring Sarah Silverman and Mindy Kaling, respectively, as well as slightly older ones from Pantene and GoldieBlox. There's also the immensely popular Always campaign "Like a Girl," in which young girls are interviewed about what it looks like to run, throw, and fight like a girl. (The answer is just like the boys.)

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