Study: Climate change made summer droughts 20 times more likely

Part of the Guadiana River in Spain has dried up.
(Image credit: Thomas Coex/AFP via Getty Images)

The summer droughts that affected parts of the United States, Europe, and China were made 20 times more likely by climate change, according to a new study by World Weather Attribution.

China had its driest summer in 60 years, while drought conditions in Europe sparked brush fires and dried up rivers. The researchers with World Weather Attribution — an international organization comprised of scientists who study the connection between climate change and extreme weather — analyzed weather data, computer simulations, and soil moisture across those areas, and discovered "climate change made dry soil conditions much more likely over the last several months," The Associated Press reports.

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