Half of GOP voters want someone other than Trump for 2024, poll finds

Donald Trump.
(Image credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

About half of Republican voters said they would prefer someone other than former President Donald Trump as the presidential nominee in 2024, a new poll from The New York Times and Siena College has found.

In a hypothetical contest against five other possible Republican nominees, just under half — 49 percent — of GOP voters said they'd support Trump's third presidential nomination. At 25 percent, Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis (R) otherwise saw the second-most support.

Notably, 64 percent of primary voters under 35 years old said they would vote against Trump in a presidential primary, the poll found. Such results suggest that Trump "would not necessarily enter a primary with an insurmountable advantage over rivals like [DeSantis]," the Times writes.

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What's more, Trump "trailed President Biden, 44 percent to 41 percent, in a hypothetical rematch of the 2020 contest," despite Biden's plummeting approval ratings, the Times reports.

But it doesn't look like Americans are hungry for another Biden-Trump ticket anyway. Per a Politico/Morning Consult survey released Tuesday, just 29 percent and 35 percent of Americans believe Biden or Trump, respectively, should run again.

Politico/Morning Consult surveyed 2005 voters betweeen July 8-10, 2022. Results have a margin of error of ± two percentage points. The New York Times and Siena College surveyed 849 voters from July 5-7, 2022. Results have a margin of error of ± four percentage points.

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