Former Trump chief of staff Mark Meadows may have committed voter fraud in North Carolina

Mark Meadows
(Image credit: Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images)

Mark Meadows, who quit his North Carolina congressional seat to become former President Donald Trump's White House chief of staff in March 2020, registered to vote for the 2020 election using the address of a rural North Carolina mobile home he never lived in and, according to its former owner, never slept at, North Carolina's WRAL reported Monday night. Meadows voted by mail from Alexandria, Virginia, in 2020, but he is still registered at the rental home in Scaly Mountain.

Registering using a residence you have never stayed at constitutes voter fraud in North Carolina and providing false information on your voter registration form is a federal crime, The New Yorker reports. North Carolina's registration form tells voters they must list the place "where you physically live," and notes it is a Class I felony to "fraudulently or falsely" complete the form, WRAL adds. Class I felonies can result in prison sentences of up to 12 months.

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Peter Weber, The Week US

Peter has worked as a news and culture writer and editor at The Week since the site's launch in 2008. He covers politics, world affairs, religion and cultural currents. His journalism career began as a copy editor at a financial newswire and has included editorial positions at The New York Times Magazine, Facts on File, and Oregon State University.