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September 10, 2015

On Thursday, Louisiana Gov. and Republican presidential candidate Bobby Jindal decided to take a stab at Donald Trump — a potentially fatal decision, as Jindal is struggling in the polls and Trump, who has a wide lead on all of his competition, has notoriously vowed to punch back at any and all of those who use his name in vain.

Speaking at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., Jindal called Trump an "unserious, unstable, narcissist… an egomaniacal madman who has no principles." He also scoffed at Trump's claims of Christianity, saying, "You may have recently seen that after Trump said the Bible is his favorite book, he couldn't name a single Bible verse or passage that meant something to him. And we all know why, because it's all just a show, and he hasn't ever read the Bible. But you know why he hasn't read the Bible? Because he's not in it."

"It's a mistake to take Trump seriously," Jindal added. "Donald Trump is for Donald Trump."

But then Jindal goes for the kill. "Donald Trump is a narcissist and an egomaniac," he said. "That may sound like a serious charge to make, but it is also something that everyone knows to be true, and he knows it too, and he celebrates it."

Read all of Jindal's prepared speech here or watch the video below. Jeva Lange

3:23 p.m. ET

Queen fans, get ready to belt your hearts out: Bohemian Rhapsody is just a few months away.

20th Century Fox released a new trailer Tuesday for the Freddie Mercury biopic, calling it "a foot-stomping celebration" of "one of the most beloved entertainers on the planet."

Framed by some of the band's most famous hits, including "We Will Rock You," "We Are The Champions," and of course the titular "Bohemian Rhapsody," the trailer gives us a look at the very beginnings of Queen and their unexpected rise to stardom. We also get brief glimpses of Mercury as he wrestles with his bisexuality and his struggle with his AIDS diagnosis, despite speculation that those parts of the story would be left untold.

Starring Emmy award-winning actor Rami Malek as Mercury, Bohemian Rhapsody is expected to be released on Nov. 2, 2018. Watch the full trailer below. Shivani Ishwar

3:18 p.m. ET
Mark Wilson/Getty Images

President Trump on Tuesday appeared to walk back many of his controversial comments from his joint press conference with Russian President Vladimir Putin, held Monday in Finland.

Trump faced widespread backlash for failing to side with the U.S. intelligence community over Putin during Monday's summit. On Tuesday, the president addressed the controversy and sought to correct the record. "I accept our intelligence community's conclusion that Russia's meddling in the 2016 election took place" he said. "Could be other people also. A lot of people out there."

He also reversed one of his most-criticized comments, when he said he didn't "see why it would be" Russia that interfered in the election. "In a key sentence in my remarks, I said the word 'would' instead of 'wouldn't,'" Trump explained. "The sentence should have been, 'I don't see any reason why it wouldn't be Russia.' Sort of a double negative. So you can put that in, and I think that probably clarifies things."

As critics pointed out, this was one of several instances in which Trump was forced to backpedal a statement after receiving fierce backlash. But Boston Globe reporter Matt Viser noted that Trump claiming he misspoke — and doing so more than 24 hours after the initial remarks — doesn't quite align with his post-press conference tweets interview with Fox News, in which he fully stood by his comments on Russia's purported innocence.

Trump added that has "full faith" in intelligence officials, and pledged that his administration "will repel any effort to interfere in our elections" going forward. Summer Meza

2:14 p.m. ET

The White House has tried to squeeze every positive ounce out of President Trump's Monday meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin.

But there may not be much there.

Congressional Republicans received their daily set of talking points from the White House on Tuesday, which are meant to help the party and the president keep a united front. But half of Tuesday's list was just a backstory of the U.S.-Russia summit in Helsinki, Finland. The other half includes four bulleted times Trump acknowledged Russian meddling or said he trusted American intelligence — four times within the full 18 months of his presidency.

Those bullet points attempt to contradict nearly everyone's criticism of Trump's post-summit press conference with Putin on Monday: that the president questioned Russia's involvement in the 2016 election instead of condemning it. But Republicans aren't taking the bait and using the points, notes NBC News' Peter Alexander — perhaps because most of them already saw the whole press conference and ripped it to shreds. Kathryn Krawczyk

1:37 p.m. ET

President Trump seemed to have a bit of a Putin hangover Tuesday.

Trump reportedly didn't emerge from his residence until past noon, following widespread criticism over his comments at a joint press conference with Russian President Vladimir Putin on Monday. An NBC News reporter pointed out that Trump was nowhere to be seen in the West Wing, perhaps because he had no events on his public schedule all morning.

Whether the president was recovering from some wicked jet lag from the flight back from Helsinki — or on the mend from the brutal comments from even his fellow GOP lawmakers — he rested all morning, firing off just four tweets. Trump is scheduled to emerge at 2 p.m. ET, when he will speak about his meeting with Putin, replacing the meeting with members of Congress that suddenly appeared on his schedule Monday. Summer Meza

1:26 p.m. ET

Jupiter's massive gravitational attraction has collected some fresh followers.

While looking for a possible ninth planet, scientists instead discovered another 12 moons orbiting the gas giant, per a Monday press release from Carnegie Science. The find brings Jupiter's total number of moons to 79, the most in the solar system.

Eleven of the new moons are pretty normal, orbiting either with or against Jupiter's rotation. But in the release, scientists called one an "oddball" because it lives far out with moons that orbit counterclockwise, but travels clockwise itself.

Carnegie's team put together this video to explain the mysterious moon, named Valetudo after the Roman god Jupiter's great-granddaughter.

Scientists suggest Valetudo's reverse orbit could cause a head-on crash one day, per the release. But in a family of 79 moons, Jupiter was bound to have one rebel. Kathryn Krawczyk

12:45 p.m. ET

In his first major speech since leaving office, former President Barack Obama endorsed the idea of providing a universal basic income.

Speaking at the Nelson Mandela Annual Lecture in South Africa on Tuesday, Obama raised the notion of guaranteed income as a way to reduce what he called "yawning disparities" in wealth, education, and security across different socioeconomic groups.

"It's not just money that a job provides," said Obama. "It provides dignity and structure and a sense of place and a sense of purpose. So we're going to have to consider new ways of thinking about these problems, like a universal income, review of our workweek, how we retrain our young people, how we make everybody an entrepreneur at some level. But we're going have to worry about economics if we want to get democracy back on track."

He additionally called on the rich to support higher taxation, saying that "you don't have to take a vow of poverty just to say 'let me help out a few of these folks.'"

Watch the moment, along with Obama's other suggestions for improving on these "strange and uncertain" times below, via NBC News. Summer Meza

12:00 p.m. ET

Former President Barack Obama said that these "strange and uncertain" times can only be combated with an effort to "keep marching" and "keep building" away from discrimination and institutional inequality.

Obama made his first major speech since leaving office at the Nelson Mandela Annual Lecture in South Africa on Tuesday. He warned of "strongman politics" that are ascendant, "whereby elections and some pretense of democracy is maintained, but those in power seek to undermine every institution or norm that gives democracy meaning." He additionally condemned "far-right" political parties that "are based not just on platforms of protectionism and closed borders, but also on barely hidden racial nationalism."

The former president voiced concern that the world is "threatening to return to a more dangerous, more brutal way of doing business," and worried that social media is helping spread "hatred, and paranoia, and propaganda, and conspiracy theories." He said that humanity is at a crossroads, and hoped that people would be willing to work towards accepting a single "objective reality" in order to keep politicians honest.

Watch his full speech below, via the Obama Foundation. Summer Meza

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