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September 10, 2015

On Thursday, Louisiana Gov. and Republican presidential candidate Bobby Jindal decided to take a stab at Donald Trump — a potentially fatal decision, as Jindal is struggling in the polls and Trump, who has a wide lead on all of his competition, has notoriously vowed to punch back at any and all of those who use his name in vain.

Speaking at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., Jindal called Trump an "unserious, unstable, narcissist… an egomaniacal madman who has no principles." He also scoffed at Trump's claims of Christianity, saying, "You may have recently seen that after Trump said the Bible is his favorite book, he couldn't name a single Bible verse or passage that meant something to him. And we all know why, because it's all just a show, and he hasn't ever read the Bible. But you know why he hasn't read the Bible? Because he's not in it."

"It's a mistake to take Trump seriously," Jindal added. "Donald Trump is for Donald Trump."

But then Jindal goes for the kill. "Donald Trump is a narcissist and an egomaniac," he said. "That may sound like a serious charge to make, but it is also something that everyone knows to be true, and he knows it too, and he celebrates it."

Read all of Jindal's prepared speech here or watch the video below. Jeva Lange

12:21 p.m. ET
ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP/Getty Images

The Trump administration on Thursday instituted new guidelines protecting pro-life medical workers. The new rules will protect medical professionals who oppose abortion, contraceptive use, or gender reassignment, allowing them to adhere to any personal objections they may have to facilitating those procedures without penalty.

Politico reported the coming announcement Tuesday, and it was confirmed by the Department of Health and Human Services on Thursday. A new department within HHS, called the "conscience and religious freedom division," will exist as a branch of the department's civil rights office for individuals to report "discrimination" against these pro-life workers, The New York Times reported.

Conservative groups celebrated the initiative, saying it properly shielded health-care workers from being compelled to betray their personal convictions. The Times noted that the HHS announcement occurred just one day before the annual March for Life in Washington, D.C., an event celebrated by social conservatives that protests abortion. Kimberly Alters

11:56 a.m. ET

With one tweet, Jackie Garza saved her family's bakery. The Houston teenager was heartbroken after her father, Trinidad Garza, confessed that sales at La Casa Bakery and Café had slowed after Hurricane Harvey, and that he might need to shutter the business for good. Taking matters into her own hands, Jackie tweeted a video of her father hand-making Mexican pastries like pan dulce, along with a call for support.

Within days, customers from all over Texas were pouring in, causing Trinidad — who had never even heard of ­Twitter — to almost run out of bread. "I've had messages from Japan, Australia, Europe," a flabbergasted Jackie told ABC13. Christina Colizza

11:43 a.m. ET
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

CNN anchor Chris Cuomo might want to brush up on his slang.

During an interview Thursday with Republican National Committee Chair Ronna Romney McDaniel, Cuomo challenged McDaniel over accusations that Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.) had "mansplained" to Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing. Nielsen appeared before the committee Tuesday, and Booker attacked her for tolerating President Trump's reported vulgar remarks about immigrants.

"You [and the RNC] accused Booker of 'mansplaining' to Nielsen," Cuomo said. "Why? Why did you call it that?" McDaniel replied that a male Republican senator would have been lambasted for talking to a woman the way Booker did to Nielsen. "I know he's auditioning for 2020, I understand that, but he was disrespectful and he did mansplain to her. And she's an intelligent woman, she's the secretary of homeland security, and she deserved an opportunity to answer his rant," she said.

Cuomo then — with no apparent sense of irony — interrupted McDaniel to show a clip of Booker responding to the RNC's accusation. Then Cuomo asked: "In this age of recognizing women as equal, once and for all, at all levels, why would [Booker] have to treat Nielsen differently?" As McDaniel tried to point to "hypocrisy" in the treatment of Nielsen compared to, say, the sympathy afforded Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.), Cuomo interrupted again to ask, "How is it mansplaining ... just because she's a woman, that's what you're saying? ... [Senators] talk to people like that all the time, Ronna, they talk to men like that all the time."

"Here's the deal," McDaniel said. "Cory Booker was grandstanding, he was lecturing her, he didn't give her a chance to respond. It was disrespectful." Watch the full interview at Mediaite. Kelly O'Meara Morales

10:39 a.m. ET

For the first time on TV, Dylan Farrow has spoken out about abuse allegations she made against her adoptive father, Woody Allen.

Farrow appeared Thursday on CBS This Morning in her first on-air interview about her allegation that Allen molested her when she was a child. Farrow first revealed the abuse in The New York Times in 2014 after it had been rumored for years. "I want to show my face and tell my story. I want to speak out literally," she told CBS's Gayle King.

Farrow told King that when she was 7 years old, Allen molested her while her mother, Mia Farrow, was out shopping. She described the incident in graphic detail: "He instructed me to lay down on my stomach and play with my brother's toy train that was set up. And he sat behind me in the doorway and as I played with the toy train, I was sexually assaulted." Farrow added, "As a 7-year-old, I would have said he touched my 'private parts,' which I did say. As a 32-year-old: He touched my labia and my vulva with his finger."

King pointed out that Allen has long maintained that Farrow's mother Mia manipulated her into making a false allegation. Farrow shot down the idea, saying, "What I don't understand is how is this crazy story of me being brainwashed and coached more believable than what I'm saying about being sexually assaulted by my father."

Allen has consistently denied Farrow's allegation. He wrote to CBS that the Farrows were "cynically using the opportunity afforded by the Time's Up movement to repeat this discredited allegation." Watch the full interview below. Kelly O'Meara Morales

10:07 a.m. ET
David Ryder/Getty Images

Amazon on Thursday released the list of 20 finalists in its headquarters contest, dubbed HQ2. Last September, the tech giant invited cities across North America to explain why they were the best location for its second headquarters, following its main hub in Seattle.

Among the 20 contenders still vying for Amazon's heart are a few major destinations, like Los Angeles and New York City, as well as an international option in Toronto. But the company is also considering some smaller-market areas, like Raleigh, North Carolina; Columbus, Ohio; and Nashville, Tennessee.

Those cities are joined by: Atlanta; Austin, Texas; Boston; Chicago; Dallas; Denver; Indianapolis; Miami; Montgomery County, Maryland; Newark, New Jersey; Northern Virginia; Philadelphia; Pittsburgh; and Washington, D.C.

Whichever city is the lucky winner will likely receive a dramatic economic boost due to Amazon's presence, as the company has said it expects to create roughly 50,000 jobs with its headquarters expansion as well as invest $5 billion in the winning city. Still, seven states didn't submit proposals to Amazon at all, Business Insider notes, due to concerns that either they could not meet the behemoth company's needs or that being home to an Amazon headquarters would create monstrous — and expensive — demands for housing and other goods.

Competition was fierce, as Amazon received 238 proposals from cities across the U.S, Mexico, and Canada. The company has said it will pick the winning city this year. Kimberly Alters

7:15 a.m. ET

On Wednesday, White House Chief of Staff John Kelly told House Democrats that some of President Trump's hardline immigration policies on the campaign were "uninformed" or "not fully informed" and that Trump had especially "evolved" in his understanding of what kind of Mexico border wall was plausible, according to Democrats in the meeting. Kelly added that the White House was seeking $20 billion for 700 miles of "physical barrier," a "50-foot wall from sea to shining sea isn't what we're going to build," attendees said, and the Mexican government won't pay for it.

"He has evolved in the way he looks at things," Kelly told Fox News on Wednesday night. "Campaign to governing are two different things, and this president has been very flexible in terms of what's in the realm of the possible." On Thursday morning, Trump disputed a number of Kelly's characterizations.

During the campaign, Trump had promised a "big, beautiful wall" along the 2,100-mile U.S.-Mexico border, most of it defined by the Rio Grande River, and vowed that Mexico would pay for it. On Thursday's New Day, CNN's Chris Cuomo and Spectrum News anchor Errol Louis noted that Trump's tweets certainly sound like an "evolved" version of Trump's original wall plan. Watch below. Peter Weber

6:13 a.m. ET
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Republicans won three out of four special elections on Tuesday in strongly Republican areas, but in each case the Democrat outperformed President Trump's 2016 numbers by at least a dozen percentage points and in one — a state Senate seat in western Wisconsin that Republicans have held for 17 years — Democrat Patty Schachtner won by 11 points, a 28-point swing from Trump's 2016 numbers. "This special election hit the Wisconsin GOP like an electric shock," said former conservative radio host Charlie Sykes. On Thursday, President Trump is heading to Pennsylvania to head off another upset in a U.S. House district Republicans have easily held for 16 years.

Republican state Rep. Rick Saccone, 59, and Democrat Conor Lamb, 33, are facing each other in a March 13 election to fill the seat former Rep. Tim Murphy (R) vacated amid a sex and abortion scandal. The gerrymandered district in western Pennsylvania voted for Trump by 19 percentage points, but "internal polls from both parties now reveal a single-digit race," The New York Times reports. Saccone has proved to be a lackluster campaigner and poor fundraiser, and so Trump is visiting Thursday, Vice President Mike Pence is campaigning with Saccone Feb. 2, and both men could return if needed, GOP officials tell the Times.

House Republicans in Washington have already contributed about half of Saccone's $200,000 war chest, and they have more fundraisers scheduled for him in Washington. Two conservative organizations have already spent $700,000 to broadcast ads against Lamb, a former prosecutor and Marine, and the Congressional Leadership Fund super PAC is going to jump in with attack ads next week. Lamb, meanwhile, has said he wants to keep the race local; the House Democratic campaign arm is unlikely to put much money in the race, and other than Vice President Joe Biden, the Times says, "few high-profile Democrats would help Mr. Lamb by dipping into the district." Lamb has raised more than $550,000. Peter Weber

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