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June 5, 2017

A highly classified National Security Agency report obtained by The Intercept suggests Russian military intelligence could have breached aspects of the U.S. voting system ahead of the 2016 presidential election. The report, sent anonymously to The Intercept and independently verified, revealed that Russia tried to hack a U.S. voting software supplier and also sent "spear-phishing emails to more than 100 local election officials" just before Election Day, The Intercept reported:

It states unequivocally in its summary statement that it was Russian military intelligence, specifically the Russian General Staff Main Intelligence Directorate, or GRU, that conducted the cyber attacks described in the document:

"Russian General Staff Main Intelligence Directorate actors … executed cyber espionage operations against a named U.S. company in August 2016, evidently to obtain information on elections-related software and hardware solutions. … The actors likely used data obtained from that operation to … launch a voter registration-themed spear-phishing campaign targeting U.S. local government organizations." [The Intercept]

Many details remain unclear, such as whether this activity affected the election's outcome. The Intercept also noted that one intelligence official warned against relying too much on a single analysis to draw conclusions.

However, the report seems to align with a review released by the Obama administration in January which stated that "Russian intelligence obtained and maintained access to elements of multiple U.S. state or local electoral boards." The Department of Homeland Security said that the systems in question were "not involved in vote tallying"; the NSA report suggests the attacks instead may have been "focused on parts of the system directly connected to the voter registration process." Becca Stanek

10:52a.m.

President Trump won't stop proclaiming House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) should be the next Speaker of the House. And Pelosi won't stop waving those endorsements away.

In a Saturday morning tweet, Trump continued his push for Pelosi in a very Trumpian way: Bragging that he could get Pelosi "as many votes as she wants" to become speaker. Trump also called out Rep. Tom Reed (R-N.Y.), a Republican who told The Buffalo News Thursday he's willing to support Pelosi, in his tweet. But when asked about Trump's endorsement — and any possible support from Republicans — Pelosi was not so kind.

Trump's endorsement comes in the wake of yet another incoming House Democrat, this time Virginia's Abigail Spanberger, saying Friday she wouldn't vote for Pelosi to become speaker. She joins 17 other Democrats who've publicly denounced Pelosi's bid, CNN reports. Pelosi met with Spanberger and several other members of her opposition on Friday, including Rep. Marcia Fudge (D-Ohio), who's considering a run against Pelosi for the top role.

Just after Democrats regained the House last week, Trump similarly tweeted that he could throw a few Republican votes her way if Democrats don't pull through. Less surprisingly, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) also tweeted that he "fully support[s]" Pelosi on Saturday morning. And Pelosi seems as confident as ever, with a spokesman telling The Washington Post Saturday that she'll "win the speakership with Democratic votes." Kathryn Krawczyk

9:48a.m.

The Supreme Court has opted to hear arguments over President Trump's administration's decision to add a question of citizenship to the 2020 census.

The question, which would directly ask if "this person a citizen of the United States," has been challenged in six lawsuits around the U.S. This has led to disputes over what evidence can be brought up during the trials, and if Trump officials' motives in enacting the addition can be discussed as well. But the Supreme Court's timing on this decision is "curious," seeing as the controversial census already undergoing one trial in New York, The Washington Post writes.

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross announced the addition in March, originally claiming the Justice Department ordered the move. But documents unveiled in one of the lawsuits later showed Ross talked about adding the question with former Trump strategist Stephen Bannon, suggesting Ross drove the change himself. Ross and other administration officials' motivations for the addition are now slated for discussion in the forthcoming Supreme Court hearing.

The Trump administration has fought to block Ross from facing questioning over the matter, and last month the Supreme Court refused to allow the deposition of Ross in the New York case, per NPR. U.S. District Judge Jesse Furman has scheduled closing arguments in the New York case for Nov. 27, while the Supreme Court has the case slated for next February.

The citizenship question has faced criticism from advocates who say undocumented people will avoid answering the census out of fear. That would lead to undercounts in Democrat-heavy areas, and perhaps cut federal aid that undocumented immigrants in those areas rely on. Kathryn Krawczyk

9:07a.m.

The Camp Fire has left 71 dead and more than 1,000 missing throughout northern California. It's also spread some of the dirtiest air in the world to San Francisco and beyond.

After burning for more than a week, 50 percent of the blaze had been contained as of Friday night, the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection said. Reports of missing people swelled from more than 600 on Friday to 1011, Butte County Sheriff Kory Honea tells CBS News. Honea also warned the list was "dynamic" and could grow or shrink as those who don't realize they've been reported missing come forward.

Meanwhile, air quality in northern California has reached levels as poor as cities in China and India. It’s nearly impossible to navigate the "apocalyptic fog" surrounding the fire, The New York Times writes, and hospital workers say reports of respiratory complications have surged. Nearly 200 miles south in San Francisco, the city’s iconic trolleys have been pulled from the streets amid smoky air. Residents have taken to wearing respiratory masks, schools have closed, and the so-called "Big Game" between the University of California, Berkeley and Stanford University has been postponed. Kathryn Krawczyk

November 16, 2018

The CIA has "high confidence" that Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman ordered the murder of U.S.-based Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, officials first told The Washington Post.

The CIA reportedly drew its evidence from, among other things, a phone call between Khashoggi and bin Salman's brother Khalid bin Salman, in which Khalid told Khashoggi to visit the Saudi consulate where he was killed. The crown prince told Khalid to make the call, per the Post. A team of 15 Saudi operatives then reportedly flew via government airplane to Istanbul for the murder.

The U.S. Treasury Department sanctioned 17 Saudis it said were "involved in" Khashoggi's murder earlier this week. But this is furthest the U.S. has gone toward implicating Saudi Arabia for the crime, per reports from multiple sources.

Khashoggi was killed after entering the Saudi consulate in Istanbul on Oct. 2, and Turkey has long maintained the Saudi government was responsible. Saudi Arabia once said the murder was a predetermined rogue operation, but shifted to say it was a random killing when announcing charges against 11 alleged perpetrators earlier this week. Bin Salman is close with President Trump's son-in-law and senior adviser Jared Kushner, and some have suggested the Trump administration avoided implicating Saudi Arabia to preserve an alliance with the country.

A spokeswoman for America's Saudi consulate told the Post that the CIA's claims in its "purported assessment are false." Kathryn Krawczyk

November 16, 2018

Democrat Stacey Abrams on Friday said that it was not possible for her to win the gubernatorial race in Georgia, admitting defeat against Republican Brian Kemp, who had already declared victory in the hotly contested race, reports NPR.

On Election Day, the race was too close to call, and Abrams accused Kemp of suppressing votes as Georgia's secretary of state in an effort to become governor. "I acknowledge that [Kemp] will be certified the victor in the 2018 gubernatorial elections," Abrams said, saying her remarks were not a concession speech. "Concession means to acknowledge an act is right, true, or proper. ... I cannot concede that." She said she would file a federal lawsuit to contest the "gross mismanagement" of the election. Abrams' campaign has said there was evidence of "misconduct, fraud, or irregularities" that may have been enough "to change or place in doubt the results."

Kemp responded to her speech by applauding her "passion and hard work," but said "we can no longer dwell on the divisive politics of the past" and must "move forward." Watch Abrams' remarks below, via CBS News. Summer Meza

November 16, 2018

President Trump once convinced drug manufacturer Pfizer to curb its price hikes. This time, he may not be so lucky.

America's biggest drug manufacturer announced Friday it would increase prices on 10 percent of its prescriptions in January, Bloomberg reports. The move comes after Republicans lost the House in last week's midterms — something experts suggest isn't a coincidence.

The price hike affects 41 prescription drugs in Pfizer's portfolio, The Wall Street Journal has learned. Most of the drugs will see a 5 percent price increase, but some could be up to 9 percent. "Newly approved medicines and sterile injectables" aren't included in the hike, the Journal writes.

Pfizer announced a similar increase on more than 40 drugs back in July, with many slated for price hikes of 9.4 percent and even higher. Trump quickly criticized the move on Twitter, and after a conversation between the president and Pfizer CEO Ian Read, Pfizer said it would delay the increases "to give the president an opportunity to work on his blueprint to strengthen the health-care system."

After Friday's revelation, Andy Slavitt, the former head of Medicare and Medicaid, suggested in a tweet that Pfizer was "back to business" now that the midterms are over. After all, Democrats will soon take over the House, limiting Trump's ability to revamp the health-care system. Trump also still hasn't enacted his plan to lower drug costs, Bloomberg notes. And Read, who the Journal says "supports the Trump administration," is stepping down as Pfizer's CEO in January.

A spokeswoman for Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar criticized the move, telling Bloomberg it shows the "perverse incentives of America's drug pricing system." Kathryn Krawczyk

November 16, 2018

First they're sour, then they're sweet. Now, they're a cereal.

That's right, Sour Patch Kids, the gummy candy shaped like small children, is joining the likes of Reese's and bringing candy to the breakfast table. Sour Patch Kids cereal will make its debut Dec. 26, and will be sold exclusively at Walmart, reports Today.

Unlike other candy cereals like Post's Oreo O's, which create delicious chocolate milk in your bowl, the $3.98 neon-colored box of Sour Patch Kids cereal will purposefully turn your milk sour. The cereal will have a "sour coating" and "sweet finish," just like the candy, says Mashable.

If you actually want to try this questionable concoction, Today says you'll find it on various retailers' shelves across the country starting in June 2019. Don't worry, you don't need ID to buy it. Taylor Watson

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