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February 28, 2018

You'd think a president who claims to have accomplished 64 percent of his agenda after one year in office wouldn't need a second term, but President Trump has been officially running for re-election since literally the day he was sworn in, and on Tuesday he named a campaign manager, Brad Parscale. Parscale, who started creating webpages for Trump in 2011 before becoming the digital backbone of his 2016 campaign, never really left — he's "on the payroll of five campaign and political advocacy organizations tied to Trump, lucrative work that made him central to Trump's campaign even before his appointment as campaign manager," The Associated Press reports, and his ties to the Trump family run deep:

Parscale has hired Eric Trump's wife, Lara, a move that reflects his close relationship to the family and shields how much she is being paid from public disclosure because she works for a private company. According to the terms of her hiring last March, she was Giles-Parscale's liaison to the campaign, working out of Trump Tower. Neither she nor Parscale responded to emailed questions about her current compensation. [The Associated Press]

Parscale is also close with Jared Kushner, Trump's son-in-law. And helping Trump win, notably by tapping into the micro-targeting power of Facebook, has been lucrative for Parscale in other ways. In August, he agreed to sell his San Antonio digital marketing company to the California firm CloudCommerce, which AP calls "a penny-stock firm with a questionable history that includes longstanding ties to a convicted fraudster" who is still involved in management decisions.

CloudCommerce has "sufficient red flags to give a responsible regulator reason to investigate," former SEC senior counsel Jacob Frenkel tells AP. "What about this company isn't a red flag?" You can read more about the company, where Parscale is now part of the management team, at AP, and learn more about Parscale in the CBS News report below. Peter Weber

12:55 p.m.

Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) expressed disatisfaction on Meet the Press Sunday with President Trump's selection of William Barr to be his next attorney general.

"I'm concerned that [Barr has] been a big supporter of the Patriot Act, which lowered the standard for spying on Americans," Paul said. "And he even went so far as to say, you know, 'The Patriot Act was pretty good, but we should go much further.'"

"I'm disturbed that he's been a big fan of taking people's property, civil asset forfeiture, without a conviction," Paul continued. "Many poor people in our country have cash taken from them, and then the government says, 'Prove to us where you got the cash, and then you can get it back.' But the burden is on the individual. It's a terrible thing called civil asset forfeiture. He's a big fan of that."

Paul noted he has not yet decided how he will vote on Barr's nomination. Watch the full interview below. Talk of Barr begins around the eight-minute mark, and Paul and host Chuck Todd also discuss Special Counsel Robert Mueller's investigation, Saudi Arabia, and more. Bonnie Kristian

12:40 p.m.

China's Foreign Ministry has summoned the U.S. and Canadian ambassadors to China to protest the arrest of Meng Wanzhou, the chief financial officer of Huawei Technologies.

Meng was taken into custody in Vancouver, Canada, on Dec. 1, at U.S. direction. She faces extradition to the United States, where she is accused of helping Huawei, a major electronics manufacturer, evade American sanctions on Iran.

Beijing said the arrest "severely violated the Chinese citizen's legal and legitimate rights and interests," calling it "lawless, reasonless and ruthless, and ... extremely vicious." Canada should "release the detainee immediately and earnestly protest the person's legal and legitimate rights and interests," the statement said, "otherwise it will definitely have serious consequences, and the Canadian side will have to bear the full responsibility for it." Bonnie Kristian

11:23 a.m.

What if the Trumps were black? That's the question asked in Saturday Night Live's trailer for Them Trumps, an imaginary new series from the makers of Empire.

Them Trumps has a solid concept and a strong line-up: President Darius Trump (Kenan Thompson), first lady Malika (Leslie Jones), Darius Jr. (Chris Redd), and L’evanka (Ego Nwodim). Where it struggles is length, as the black Trump can't seem to avoid arrest as easily as his white counterpart.

"Maybe I've done some dirty things. But I'm making America great again," Thompson's Trump rants. "And what these feds don't realize is that I'm the president, the most powerful man in the most respected office in the world. They can't lock me up, and even though I may be black—"

That's then the feds show up. Watch the full sketch below. Bonnie Kristian

10:52 a.m.

The House Judiciary and Oversight Committees on Saturday evening released a transcript of former FBI Director James Comey's lengthy testimony from the day before — and President Trump, naturally, denied it all early Sunday:

Trump has long made Comey, whom he fired last year, a target of his ire. Read Comey's full testimony here. Bonnie Kristian

10:21 a.m.

A major winter storm began Saturday in southeastern states, especially North and South Carolina, and is expected to bring unusually heavy snow through Monday. "Snowfall amounts in some locations will likely exceed a foot and result in several days of difficult or impossible travel, extended power outages, and downed trees," the National Weather Service warned.

Already more than 200,000 customers in the region have lost power, the bulk of them in North Carolina, and hundreds of flights were grounded Sunday. North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper urged residents to stay safe indoors. "Snow may be beautiful, but it can also be treacherous, and I urge North Carolinians to take this storm seriously and get ready for it now," he said. Bonnie Kristian

10:11 a.m.

The United Kingdom's House of Commons is scheduled to vote Tuesday on whether to proceed with Prime Minister Theresa May's plan for Brexit, the U.K.'s exit from the European Union.

But whether the vote will proceed as planned remains uncertain, as opposition inside and out May's Conservative Party makes its prospects look dim. Protest resignations from May's own government are expected Sunday and Monday, but May's office says the vote will go forward.

May has warned fellow Tories who oppose her plan that its failure may lead to a general election, a new government, and the "very real risk of no Brexit" at all.

The deal under consideration was settled with EU leaders late last month, and European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker warned critics it is the best realistic option. Bonnie Kristian

8:41 a.m.

Robert De Niro returned to Saturday Night Live as Special Counsel Robert Mueller, who also happens to be the boogeyman lurking in poor, sweet, dumb Eric Trump's (Alex Moffatt) closet.

After the more savvy Donald Trump Jr. (Mikey Day) finishes Eric's bedtime story, De Niro's Mueller comes over to his bedside for a chat. "Mr. Mueller," Eric says, "people say you're the worst thing to ever happen to my dad."

"No, Eric," Mueller replies. "Getting elected president was the worst thing that ever happened to your dad." Watch the full sketch below. Bonnie Kristian

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