August 21, 2014
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Iran says it will help the U.S. and its allies fight the Sunni militants who have swept across Iraq — but only in exchange for the removal of crippling sanctions aimed at curbing Tehran's nuclear ambitions.

"If we agree to do something in Iraq, the other side of the negotiations should do something in return," Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif said, according to the IRNA news agency.

"All the sanctions that are related to Iran's nuclear program should be lifted," he added.

The sanctions are at the heart of ongoing multilateral negotiations over Iran's nuclear program. After the talks missed the original July 20 completion deadline, they've limped forward with little progress.

Back in June, Secretary of State John Kerry said the U.S. was open to working with Iran to some degree, though he ruled out military cooperation. Jon Terbush

1:10 p.m. ET

The FBI is reopening the investigation into Hillary Clinton's private email server that she used while serving as secretary of state, NBC News has learned. FBI Director James Comey wrote in a letter to Congress that "in connection with an unrelated case, the FBI has learned of the existence of emails that appear to be pertinent to the investigation … I agreed that the FBI should take appropriate investigative steps designed to allow investigators to review these emails to determine whether they contain classified information, as well as to assess their importance to our investigation."

Analysts at NBC pointed out that there would have to be "pretty dramatic information in these emails to change the previous conclusion."

"Could be a big deal. Or nothing," Mother Jones' Washington bureau chief David Corn observed.

In July, the FBI recommended no criminal charges for Clinton, but Comey did call her handling of classified information in emails "extremely careless" during his congressional testimony. Jeva Lange

12:55 p.m. ET

Dogs may be man's best friend, but let's be honest — a dog's best friend is her chew toy. One couple decided to surprise their pooch Jolene with a real-life version of her favorite squishy, Gumby. The result is completely aww inducing.

Watch the completely adorable surprise unfold below. Jeva Lange

12:44 p.m. ET

The hack and leak of campaign chairman John Podesta's emails has resulted in a major headache for the team behind Hillary Clinton. But as it turns out in newly released WikiLeaks emails, Clinton's own IT help desk might be accidentally responsible for the emails getting out.

Last week, Motherboard reported that the hack resulted from Podesta falling for a phishing attempt that was disguised as Google alerting him that his account had been compromised. "The phishing email that Podesta received on March 19 contained a URL, created with the popular Bitly shortening service, pointing to a longer URL that, to an untrained eye, looked like a Google link," Motherboard wrote. "Inside that long URL, there's a 30-character string that looks like gibberish but is actually the encoded Gmail address of John Podesta. ... That's the link that opened Podesta's account to the hackers."

But when Clinton's IT team was alerted to the fake email, they actually confirmed it was "legitimate."

"This is a legitimate email," Charles Delavan, part of Clinton's IT team, seemingly confirmed, as can be seen on the WikiLeaks page here. "John needs to change his password immediately, and ensure that two-factor authentication is turned on his account."

Of course, this is not the first time concerns about Clinton's email security have come up. Many of the candidate's critics have expressed concern over possible vulnerabilities in the private email server she used while serving as secretary of state. Jeva Lange

12:13 p.m. ET

Marco Rubio really wants to hold onto his Senate seat, he swears — but it seems like Florida voters may not be so sure.

After his failed presidential bid, the Florida Republican swore up and down he'd be a "private citizen" come January 2017, right up until he reversed course and announced he'd run for re-election to the Senate. Rubio's flip-flop was largely interpreted in part as an effort to help Republicans hold onto their Senate majority, with Rubio being a strong candidate against Democratic opponent Rep. Patrick Murphy. But a new Public Policy Polling survey shows Rubio locked in a dead heat with Murphy:

Public Policy Polling surveyed 742 likely Florida voters for this poll from Oct. 25-26, and the results have a 3.6-point margin of error. But while the poll shows the two men in a dead heat, its results also hint at how either candidate can get a leg up in the race: PPP noted that undecided voters are "looking at gun violence prevention as a major factor in their upcoming vote," with 72 percent of these undecided respondents supporting background checks for all gun sales.

Rubio has said he was moved to jump back into the Senate race in part by the deadly June attack on an Orlando nightclub, where a lone gunman killed 49 people — though last December he voted against a measure that would have expanded background checks.

Rubio has also been attempting to distance himself from Donald Trump, who trails Hillary Clinton in the same PPP poll by 4 points in the Sunshine State. But Rubio has affirmed that he'll be voting for Trump, so whether Rubio's delicate dance around the Republican nominee will help or hurt him remains to be seen. The RealClearPolitics average of polls of the Rubio-Murphy race shows the incumbent hanging on to a 3.6-point lead — but it also shows Murphy has been steadily gaining support in recent weeks. The two held their second and final debate Wednesday at Broward College near Fort Lauderdale, which you can read more about at the Miami Herald. Kimberly Alters

11:51 a.m. ET

The star-like rise of the tech industry has come with one big downside, The Wall Street Journal reports: Money is pouring in, but jobs are disappearing.

The five largest U.S.-based tech companies by stock-­market value — Apple, Alphabet, Micro­soft, Face­book, and Oracle — are worth a com­bined $1.8 trillion. That's 80 percent more than the five most valuable tech companies in 2000: Cisco, Intel, IBM, Oracle, and Micro­soft. But today's tech giants employ 22 percent fewer workers than their predecessors. The big five had a combined 434,500 employees last year, compared with 556,520 at the top five firms in 2000.

Some of it has to do with companies outsourcing production to foreign countries with cheaper labor, as well as the increased use of machines to replace routine, low-skill work. "As much as $2 trillion worth of human economic activity could be automated away using existing technologies," The Journal reports. The Week Staff

11:44 a.m. ET
Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images

Last year, 64 former Congress mem­bers sat on corporate boards — 31 Democrats and 33 Republicans — earning an average $357,182 each, roughly twice what they earned as lawmakers. Former House Majority Leader Eric Cantor made a whopping $2 million last year serving on the board of investment bank Moelis & Co., Bloomberg reports.

Since 1992, 44 percent of former senators and 11 percent of former representatives have become corporate directors. Some watchdog groups cry foul, saying "a lawmaker might hold his or her fire on an issue to increase the odds of getting a director job" after his tenure in Washington. But others point out it's unfair to demonize former politicians for seeking another career later in life. The Week Staff

11:09 a.m. ET

While the Washington Redskins have long been the focal point of the sports branding racism debates, the Cleveland Indians' presence in this year's World Series has thrown their cartoon mascot, "Chief Wahoo," back into the spotlight.

What is remarkable about the Indians' branding is that it has grown worse over time, as demonstrated by a historical progression of Cleveland logos shared by Fast Company. In the team's earliest years, its logo was a simple C for Cleveland, but in 1928 the team adopted a pictorial logo. It all went downhill from there, and though the C logo was brought back in 2014, Chief Wahoo still appears in arguably his most racist form on the team's uniforms and merchandise.

The Braves, currently of Atlanta, followed a similar pattern of moving from single letter logos and more realistic depictions of their Native mascot to an increasingly cartoonish and literally red version.

For more on Chief Wahoo in particular and Native imagery in sports more broadly, check out this analysis from The Week's Emily L. Hauser. Bonnie Kristian

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