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Coming Soon
July 15, 2014

For its first animated movie based on a Marvel franchise, Disney could have adapted any number of famed superhero franchises. Instead, the company went in an intriguingly more offbeat direction: Big Hero 6, a relatively obscure series about an Avengers-esque team of superheroic misfits that includes a sword-wielding chef and a 13-year-old boy genius.

The story may be less familiar to mainstream audiences, but it's clear from this first full-length trailer that Big Hero 6 will be wackier than a standard Marvel superhero flick. Protagonist Hiro may squeeze his robotic balloon pal into something that looks like an Iron Man suit, but his goofy antics are a little more family-friendly than your average, explosion-happy summer blockbuster.

Big Hero 6 hits theaters in November. --Scott Meslow

Gun Violence
10:29 a.m. ET
Michael B. Thomas/Getty Images

When Darren Goforth, a white deputy officer, was ambushed and fatally shot Friday night, allegedly by a black man at a gas station outside Houston, Harris County Sheriff Ron Hickman wasted no time in linking the incident to the ongoing Black Lives Matter protests of police brutality.

"We've heard black lives matter; all lives matter. Well, cops' lives matter too," Hickman said Saturday. "At any point where the rhetoric ramps up to the point where calculated cold-blooded assassination of police officers happen(s), this rhetoric has gotten out of control."

Firearms-related deaths of law enforcement officers in 2015 are down from the same period last year, Reuters reports.

Hickman called the shooting of the 10-year veteran "unprovoked." Deputies arrested 30-year-old Shannon Miles on Saturday. Julie Kliegman

RIP
8:42 a.m. ET
Chris McGrath/Getty Images

British neurologist and author Oliver Sacks died at 82 on Sunday, months after being diagnosed with terminal eye cancer, The New York Times reports. Sacks was a practicing doctor and a professor of neurology at New York University.

He was also well-known for his best-selling books, including The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and An Anthropologist on Mars. Awakenings, his autobiographical account of treating patients with encephalitis lethargica, a condition that renders people motionless, was later adapted in an Oscar-winning film starring Robin Williams and Robert De Niro.

In February, Sacks wrote about his ocular melanoma diagnosis and confronting his mortality in a touching Times op-ed:

I cannot pretend I am without fear. But my predominant feeling is one of gratitude. I have loved and been loved; I have been given much and I have given something in return; I have read and traveled and thought and written. I have had an intercourse with the world, the special intercourse of writers and readers. Above all, I have been a sentient being, a thinking animal, on this beautiful planet, and that in itself has been an enormous privilege and adventure. [The New York Times]

He wrote again for the Times earlier in August about "achieving a sense of peace within oneself" as he grew physically weaker. Julie Kliegman

Presidential polling
8:02 a.m. ET
Charlie Leight/Getty Images

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) is gaining ground on Democratic presidential frontrunner Hillary Clinton in Iowa, which will hold the country's first caucuses Feb. 1. The Des Moines Register/Bloomberg Politics poll released Saturday shows Sanders just 7 percentage points behind Clinton's 37. She's lost a third of her Iowa support since May.

Vice President Joe Biden, who is rumored to be considering a campaign, took 14 percent out of the 404 likely caucus voters polled.

On the Republican side, retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson sits in second at 18 percent to Donald Trump's 23 percent. Only 29 percent of likely Republican caucusgoers said they'd never vote for Trump, a figure that's halved since May. Julie Kliegman

Katrina at 10
August 29, 2015
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

On Saturday, New Orleans residents commemorated the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, which killed more than 1,800 people and cost $151 billion in damage across the region.

"We saved each other," Mayor Mitch Landrieu told dignitaries at a memorial for the unidentified and unclaimed dead, The Associated Press reports. "New Orleans will be unbowed and unbroken."

Residents and activists gathered for speeches and a parade in the city's Lower 9th Ward at the site of one levee that had broken. In Mississippi, also hit hard by Katrina, coastal church bells rang out to remember one of the deadliest storms in U.S. history.

President Barack Obama and former President George W. Bush, who was in office when the storm hit, both visited New Orleans in the days leading up to the anniversary. Julie Kliegman

Immigration
August 29, 2015
Andrew Burton/Getty Images

Presidential hopeful and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie (R) spoke to a crowd in Laconia, New Hampshire, on Saturday about the need to crack down on legal immigration enforcement.

He rejected competitor Donald Trump's idea to build a wall across the entire U.S.-Mexican border, but suggested if he becomes president, he'd use FedEx's package tracking strategies to more closely track people entering the country:

The minute they come in, we lose track of them? So here's what I'm going to do as president: I'm going to ask Fred Smith, the founder of Federal Express, to come work for the government for three months at Immigration and Customs Enforcement and show these people. We need to have a system that tracks you from the moment you come in, and then when your time is up... however long your visa is, then we go get you. We tap you on the shoulder and say, "Thanks for coming. Time to go." [The Star-Ledger]

While this isn't the first time Republicans have used FedEx rhetoric to talk immigration policy, Smith's daughter, Samantha, serves as Christie's campaign spokeswoman.

Christie also criticized President Obama's nuclear deal with Iran and other world powers on Saturday, calling the U.S. under Obama's oversight "a nation of lawlessness," The Star-Ledger reports. Julie Kliegman

findings
August 29, 2015

Researchers at an archaeological site in Catalonia, Spain, discovered an inner part of a cave that may have been used for sleeping, the first such area linked to a Neanderthal site, Archaeology reports.

The Catalan Institute of Human Paleoecology archaeologists say the sleeping area found at Abric Romaní is distinctive from other parts of the cave because it features a lower density of artifacts. They also found a hole near a wall that may have been used to heat water 60,000 years ago.

The potential bedroom and water-heating system were found among 10,000 Neanderthal artifacts researchers found at the site in August. Julie Kliegman

Quotables
August 29, 2015
Photo by Charley Gallay/Getty Images for Tom Ford

In a tease for her upcoming Elle UK cover story, Miley Cyrus said she identifies as pansexual, which means she considers herself attracted to people of all gender identities.

"I'm very open about it — I'm pansexual," she said. "But I'm not in a relationship. I'm 22, I'm going on dates, but I change my style every two weeks, let alone who I'm with."

The pop star and upcoming VMAs host had described her fluid sexuality similarly, without using the word pansexual, in a not-safe-for-work photoshoot with Paper Magazine in June.

"I am literally open to every single thing that is consenting and doesn’t involve an animal and everyone is of age," she said. "Everything that's legal, I'm down with. Yo, I'm down with any adult — anyone over the age of 18 who is down to love me. I don't relate to being boy or girl, and I don't have to have my partner relate to boy or girl."

You might say she's just being Miley. Julie Kliegman

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